gross evidence

Any physical evidence that can link an alleged perpetrator or known victim to a particular location or crime
Examples Garments, footwear, bed linen, rope, bullets, knives, glass, paint chips

gross evidence

Forensic medicine Physical evidence that can link a perpetrator or victim to a particular location or crime Examples Garments, footwear, bed linen, rope, bullets, knives, glass, paint chips
References in periodicals archive ?
Final pathology revealed benign mucosa with scattered reactive lymphoid aggregates, vascular congestion, focal acute serositis, fibrous adhesions, and gross evidence of small bowel telescoping.
A post-operative MRI with contrast enhancement revealed extensive sinonasal resection with no gross evidence of residual tumor (figure 3).
Marine scientist Dr Brownlow said: "Meningitis would definitely explain their stranding but there is no gross evidence at this stage of disease - that's why we're conducting the bacteriological tests.
All muscles were found to be healthy and viable, with no gross evidence of infection.
The postmortem gross evidence of necrotic areas in the lung and spleen and hemorrhages in the kidneys is clearly consistent with sickled erythrocytes causing vascular congestion and infarction, thus contributing to the patient's death.
In particular, the latter and their major branches were cross-sectioned at 3-mm intervals, with no gross evidence of lesion or lumen reduction.
Not only did all the wound sites heal without gross evidence of rejection, but "remarkably, each of the sites of dermal sheath implantation produced new follicles and fibers 3 to 5 weeks after the graft," wrote lead author Colin Jahoda, PhD and colleagues.
Although no gross evidence of tularemia was observed, the specimen was treated as potentially infected with tularemia because the veterinarian requested F.