groove

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groove

 [gro̳v]
a narrow, linear hollow or depression.
branchial groove pharyngeal groove.
Harrison's groove a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in advanced rickets in childhood.
medullary groove (neural groove) that formed by the beginning invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
pharyngeal groove a groove between a pair of pharyngeal arches in a mammalian embryo, homologous to the branchial cleft of a fish, formed by rupture of the membrane separating a corresponding entodermal pouch and ectodermal groove.

groove

(grūv), [TA]
A narrow, elongated depression or furrow on any surface.
See also: sulcus.

groove

(grldbomacv) a narrow, linear hollow or depression.
branchial groove  pharyngeal g.
Harrison's groove  a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in advanced rickets in children.
medullary groove , neural groove that formed by beginning invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
pharyngeal groove  the embryonic ectodermal cleft between successive pharyngeal arches.
primitive groove  a lengthwise median furrow in the primitive streak of the embryo.

groove

Etymology: AS, grafan, to dig
a shallow, linear depression in various structures throughout the body, such as those that form channels for nerves along the bones, those in bones for the insertion of muscles, and those between certain areas of the brain.

groove

(grūv) [TA]
A narrow elongated depression or furrow on any surface.
See also: sulcus

groove

(grūv) [TA]
A narrow, elongated depression or furrow on any surface.

groove,

n a linear channel or sulcus.
groove, abutment,
n a transverse groove that may be cut in the bone across the alveolar ridge to furnish positive seating for the implant framework and to prevent tension of the tissue.
groove, developmental,
n a fine depressed line in the enamel of a tooth that marks the union of the lobes of the crown in its development.
groove, gingiva, free,
n the shallow line or depression on the surface of the gingiva at the junction of the free and attached gingivae.
groove, interdental,
n a linear, vertical depression on the surface of the interdental papillae; functions as a spillway for food from the interproximal areas.
groove, labiomental,
n a natural indentation in the chin, just below the lips, that takes its form from the muscles and bones lying beneath the skin.
groove, linguogingival,
n vertical groove on the lingual surface of certain anterior teeth that originates in the lingual pit and extends cervically and slightly distal onto the cingulum.
groove, marginal,
n a developmental groove that forms across the marginal ridges of posterior teeth.
groove, nasolacrimal
n a linear depression that extends from the eye to the olfactory sac in an embryo and separates the lateral nasal process from the maxillary process.
groove, retention,
n a groove formed by opposing vertical constrictions in the preparation of a tooth that provides improved retention of the restoration.

groove

a narrow, linear hollow or depression. Called also sulcus.

abomasal groove
the third part of the gastric groove. Runs along the inside of the lesser curvature of the abomasum.
alar groove
the slot-like part of the nostril of the dog beneath the wing of the nose; the homologous part in other animals.
atrioventricular groove
see coronary groove (below).
branchial groove
an external furrow lined with ectoderm, occurring in the embryo between two branchial arches.
carpal groove
the bony part of the carpal tunnel on the palmar surfaces of the carpal bones.
coronary groove
indicates, on the external surface of the heart, the demarcation of the atria from the ventricles. Called also atrioventricular groove.
esophageal groove
a superseded name for reticular groove.
gastric groove
in the simple stomach runs along the lesser curvature of the internal surface from the cardia to the pylorus. In the ruminant it is divided into three parts, the reticular, omasal and abomasal grooves.
hoof g's
coronet to sole grooves in ruminant hooves; demarcate horn of wall from horn of heel; the axial groove is a point of weakness and subject to injury.
humerus groove
see intertubercular groove (below).
intermammary groove
median groove which divides the mammary glands into left and right halves.
intertubercular groove
separates the tubercles at the head of the humerus; called also humerus groove.
interventricular groove
there are two of these, right and left, which are external indicators of the separation between the two ventricles. The two grooves do not quite meet at the apex.
jugular groove
the furrow in the ventral part of the neck which accommodates the jugular vein just below the skin.
lacrimal groove
on the nasal surface of the maxillary bone; houses the nasolacrimal duct.
laryngotracheal groove
in fetal development this groove appears in the ventral wall of the pharynx and deepens and separates to form the trachea and lower respiratory tract.
left descending interventricular grooves
see paraconal groove (below).
medullary groove, neural groove
that formed by the invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
omasal groove
the middle segment of the gastric groove in the ruminant, between the reticulo-omasal and the omasoabomasal orifices.
optic groove
on the internal surface of the presphenoid bone; occupied by the optic chiasma.
ossification groove
see ossification groove.
paraconal groove
the fat and vessel-filled furrow on the left side of the heart, marking the division between the two ventricles; named from its position beside the conus arteriosus; called also left descending interventricular grooves.
paracuneal groove
deep V-shaped furrows which separate the frog of the equine hoof from the bars and the sole.
rachitic groove
a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in cases of advanced rickets.
groove of Ranvier
see ossification groove.
reticular groove
see reticular groove.
right descending interventricular groove
see subsinuosal groove (below).
ruminoreticular groove
the external demarcation of the division between the reticulum and the rumen.
subsinuosal groove
fat and vessel-filled groove on the right side of the heart, marking the division between the two ventricles; named for its position beneath the sinus venosus; called also right descending interventricular groove.
References in classic literature ?
On the other hand, there are those that make toward survival, the fit individuals who escape from the rule of the obvious and the expected and adjust their lives to no matter what strange grooves they may stray into, or into which they may be forced.
On the roof of my closet, not directly over the middle of the hammock, I ordered the joiner to cut out a hole of a foot square, to give me air in hot weather, as I slept; which hole I shut at pleasure with a board that drew backward and forward through a groove.
I had discovered, near the Punjab lasso, in a groove in the floor, a black-headed nail of which I knew the use.
Not knowing what to trust, I did not know what to do, and so had only to keep on working in what had hitherto been the groove of my life.
A box of projectiles in a groove in the thickness of the butt end contained about twenty of these electric balls, which, by means of a spring, were forced into the barrel of the gun.
First he set the axes in a row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had made straight by line.
The islander, placing the larger stick obliquely against some object, with one end elevated at an angle of forty-five degrees, mounts astride of it like an urchin about to gallop off upon a cane, and then grasping the smaller one firmly in both hands, he rubs its pointed end slowly up and down the extent of a few inches on the principal suck, until at last he makes a narrow groove in the wood, with an abrupt termination at the point furthest from him, where all the dusty particles which the friction creates are accumulated in a little heap.
The eldest wore the white tie, high waistcoat, and thin-brimmed hat of the regulation curate; the second was the normal undergraduate; the appearance of the third and youngest would hardly have been sufficient to characterize him; there was an uncribbed, uncabined aspect in his eyes and attire, implying that he had hardly as yet found the entrance to his professional groove.
I liked the picture of him starting at the age of forty-seven, when most men have already settled comfortably in a groove, for a new world.
After the destruction of Moscow and of his property, thrown out of his accustomed groove he seemed to have lost the sense of his own significance and to feel that there was no longer a place for him in life.
Now, as my eyes wandered all over the great landscape, I saw it in every direction--and moving, to my amazement, in the very same groove in which it had halted.
Eventually, however, Avonlea school slipped back into its old groove and took up its old interests.