groove

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groove

 [gro̳v]
a narrow, linear hollow or depression.
branchial groove pharyngeal groove.
Harrison's groove a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in advanced rickets in childhood.
medullary groove (neural groove) that formed by the beginning invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
pharyngeal groove a groove between a pair of pharyngeal arches in a mammalian embryo, homologous to the branchial cleft of a fish, formed by rupture of the membrane separating a corresponding entodermal pouch and ectodermal groove.

groove

(grūv), [TA]
A narrow, elongated depression or furrow on any surface.
See also: sulcus.

groove

(grldbomacv) a narrow, linear hollow or depression.
branchial groove  pharyngeal g.
Harrison's groove  a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in advanced rickets in children.
medullary groove , neural groove that formed by beginning invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
pharyngeal groove  the embryonic ectodermal cleft between successive pharyngeal arches.
primitive groove  a lengthwise median furrow in the primitive streak of the embryo.

groove

Etymology: AS, grafan, to dig
a shallow, linear depression in various structures throughout the body, such as those that form channels for nerves along the bones, those in bones for the insertion of muscles, and those between certain areas of the brain.

groove

(grūv) [TA]
A narrow elongated depression or furrow on any surface.
See also: sulcus

groove

(grūv) [TA]
A narrow, elongated depression or furrow on any surface.

groove,

n a linear channel or sulcus.
groove, abutment,
n a transverse groove that may be cut in the bone across the alveolar ridge to furnish positive seating for the implant framework and to prevent tension of the tissue.
groove, developmental,
n a fine depressed line in the enamel of a tooth that marks the union of the lobes of the crown in its development.
groove, gingiva, free,
n the shallow line or depression on the surface of the gingiva at the junction of the free and attached gingivae.
groove, interdental,
n a linear, vertical depression on the surface of the interdental papillae; functions as a spillway for food from the interproximal areas.
groove, labiomental,
n a natural indentation in the chin, just below the lips, that takes its form from the muscles and bones lying beneath the skin.
groove, linguogingival,
n vertical groove on the lingual surface of certain anterior teeth that originates in the lingual pit and extends cervically and slightly distal onto the cingulum.
groove, marginal,
n a developmental groove that forms across the marginal ridges of posterior teeth.
groove, nasolacrimal
n a linear depression that extends from the eye to the olfactory sac in an embryo and separates the lateral nasal process from the maxillary process.
groove, retention,
n a groove formed by opposing vertical constrictions in the preparation of a tooth that provides improved retention of the restoration.

groove

a narrow, linear hollow or depression. Called also sulcus.

abomasal groove
the third part of the gastric groove. Runs along the inside of the lesser curvature of the abomasum.
alar groove
the slot-like part of the nostril of the dog beneath the wing of the nose; the homologous part in other animals.
atrioventricular groove
see coronary groove (below).
branchial groove
an external furrow lined with ectoderm, occurring in the embryo between two branchial arches.
carpal groove
the bony part of the carpal tunnel on the palmar surfaces of the carpal bones.
coronary groove
indicates, on the external surface of the heart, the demarcation of the atria from the ventricles. Called also atrioventricular groove.
esophageal groove
a superseded name for reticular groove.
gastric groove
in the simple stomach runs along the lesser curvature of the internal surface from the cardia to the pylorus. In the ruminant it is divided into three parts, the reticular, omasal and abomasal grooves.
hoof g's
coronet to sole grooves in ruminant hooves; demarcate horn of wall from horn of heel; the axial groove is a point of weakness and subject to injury.
humerus groove
see intertubercular groove (below).
intermammary groove
median groove which divides the mammary glands into left and right halves.
intertubercular groove
separates the tubercles at the head of the humerus; called also humerus groove.
interventricular groove
there are two of these, right and left, which are external indicators of the separation between the two ventricles. The two grooves do not quite meet at the apex.
jugular groove
the furrow in the ventral part of the neck which accommodates the jugular vein just below the skin.
lacrimal groove
on the nasal surface of the maxillary bone; houses the nasolacrimal duct.
laryngotracheal groove
in fetal development this groove appears in the ventral wall of the pharynx and deepens and separates to form the trachea and lower respiratory tract.
left descending interventricular grooves
see paraconal groove (below).
medullary groove, neural groove
that formed by the invagination of the neural plate of the embryo to form the neural tube.
omasal groove
the middle segment of the gastric groove in the ruminant, between the reticulo-omasal and the omasoabomasal orifices.
optic groove
on the internal surface of the presphenoid bone; occupied by the optic chiasma.
ossification groove
see ossification groove.
paraconal groove
the fat and vessel-filled furrow on the left side of the heart, marking the division between the two ventricles; named from its position beside the conus arteriosus; called also left descending interventricular grooves.
paracuneal groove
deep V-shaped furrows which separate the frog of the equine hoof from the bars and the sole.
rachitic groove
a horizontal groove along the lower border of the thorax corresponding to the costal insertion of the diaphragm; seen in cases of advanced rickets.
groove of Ranvier
see ossification groove.
reticular groove
see reticular groove.
right descending interventricular groove
see subsinuosal groove (below).
ruminoreticular groove
the external demarcation of the division between the reticulum and the rumen.
subsinuosal groove
fat and vessel-filled groove on the right side of the heart, marking the division between the two ventricles; named for its position beneath the sinus venosus; called also right descending interventricular groove.
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This week, comedian Julian Clary (left) gets to grips with dance partner Erin Boag, the Strictly Come Dancing star is fronting a Surf Tropical campaign to make the UK a nation of twinkle-toed movers and groovers by giving away 40,000 salsa lessons.
Casual groovers can choose from a camel and cream raglan sip sweat top emblazoned with the essential 'Cream' logo, worn with a pair of glitter denim bootleg trousers perfect for hitting the dance floor.
Ibiza is the mecca of clubland and The A List has teamed up with Diamond White, everyone's favourite party drink, to offer disco groovers 48 hours of the purest pleasure at some of the best clubs on the island.
The tune made it into the record books when 500,000 groovers caught the bug and wriggled to The Macarena in Dallas.
When one thinks of household names, headliner Tom Hingley's might not immediately spring to mind, yet as singer in post-baggy groovers The Inspiral Carpets, his was an ubiquitous face in the indie media at the turn of the decade.
The trio's first hit, the irresistible bar-stool rocker ``Closing Time,'' is already all over radio, but it's just one of many fine r&b-tinged groovers here.