grief


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grief

 [grēf]
1. keen mental suffering or distress over affliction or loss.
2. mental suffering or distress in response to a threatened or real loss, as loss of a body part or function, death of another person, or loss of one's possessions, job, status, or ideals; see also mourning. Various theorists have proposed stages of grieving; see descriptions under dying.

grief

(grēf),
a normal emotional response to an external loss; distinguished from a depressive disorder because it usually subsides after a reasonable time.

grief

(grēf) the normal emotional response to an external and consciously recognized loss.

grief

Etymology: L, gravis, heavy
a nearly universal pattern of physical and emotional responses to bereavement, separation, or loss. It is time linked and must be differentiated from depression. The physical components are similar to those of fear, rage, and pain: Stimulation of the sympathetic portion of the autonomic nervous system can cause increased heart and respiratory rates, dilated pupils, sweating, bristling of the hair, increased blood flow to the muscles, and increased energy reserves. Digestion slows. The emotional components proceed in stages from alarm to disbelief and denial, to anger and guilt, to a search for a source of comfort, and, finally, to adjustment to the loss. The way in which a grieving person behaves is greatly affected by the culture in which he or she has been raised. See also bereavement, parental grief.

grief

(grēf)
A normal emotional response to an external loss; distinguished from a depressive disorder because it usually subsides after a variable but reasonable time.

grief

The mental and physical responses to major loss of whatever kind, especially loss of a loved person. The mental aspects include unhappiness, anguish and pain, guilt, anger and resentment. The physical aspects are caused by overaction of the sympathetic part of the autonomic nervous system. This causes rapid breathing and heart rate, loss of appetite, a sense of a lump in the throat (GLOBUS HYSTERICUS), a fluttering sensation in the upper abdomen and sometimes severe restlessness. Grief follows a pattern of recognizable stages, some of which are: a sense of being stunned; refusal to accept the event; denial; a feeling of alarm; anger; a sense of guilt; and, eventually, consolation, adjustment and forgetting.

Patient discussion about grief

Q. what should i take for a sorrow throat?

A. There are many types of tablets you can take under your tongue that help relieve the pain, and you can get them over the counter. You should see a doctor if the sore throat continues longer than 1-2 days, to makw sure there is no possible bacterial infection involved in which case you will need antibiotics.

Q. On Joy and Sorrow Kahlil Gibran Your joy is your sorrow unmasked. And the selfsame well from which your laughter rises was oftentimes filled with your tears. And how else can it be? The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain. Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter's oven? And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed with knives? When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy. When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see that in truth you are weeping for that which has been your delight.

A. without experiencing joy we could not recognize sorrow. and consequently, without sorrow we could not recognize joy.

Q. when do i know if my hobby of drinking become not healthy as addiction to the sorrow drop?

A. CRISTA;YOU NEED TO GET A BETTER HOBBIE?--hobbies are fun but this one is dangerous(check out some of the answers on this web site about alcohol--every time you take a drink you are killing brain cells -liver cells an causing an electro imbalance in your body,thats way people get a hangover ofter drinking--ALCOHOL AS A HOBBIE(BAD NEWS)-mrfoot56

More discussions about grief
References in classic literature ?
Norah's influence had been exerted to rouse her sister; and Norah's patient sympathy had set the prisoned grief free.
Morrel pronounced these words with perfect calmness; Valentine looked at him a moment with her large, scrutinizing eyes, endeavoring not to let Morrel discover the grief which struggled in her heart.
Lisbeth burst out immediately, her wailing impulse returning, for grief in its freshness feels the need of associating its loss and its lament with every change of scene and incident, "thee'st got nobody now but thy old mother to torment thee and be a burden to thee.
As she swept silently into the room she impressed me with a greater sense of grief than the banker had done in the morning, and it was the more striking in her as she was evidently a woman of strong character, with immense capacity for self-restraint.
Clayton and Lieutenant Charpentier brought up the rear of the column; the Englishman silent in respect for the other's grief, for D'Arnot and Charpentier had been inseparable friends since boyhood.
Every one turned his eyes towards Mousqueton, who was still lost in grief.
It was pitiful to see Cornelius, dumb with grief, and pale from utter prostration, stretch out his head through the iron bars of his window, at the risk of not being able to draw it back again, to try and get a glimpse of the garden on the left spoken of by Rosa, who had told him that its parapet overlooked the river.
Overcome with shame and grief, they tried to cry and bemoan their fate.
At length the decent time for sickness and immoderate grief being expired, the doctors were discharged, and the lady began to see company; being altered only from what she was before, by that colour of sadness in which she had dressed her person and countenance.
Than in gushing tears pour forth all thy grief concerning thy fulness, and concerning the craving of the vine for the vintager and vintage-knife!
how the father clung to the doctor then, and with what a sickening anxiety he followed him: what a weight of grief was off his mind when, after the crisis of the fever, the lad recovered, and looked at his father once more with eyes that recognised him.
For my own part, I begin to love him as a brother, and his constant and deep grief fills me with sympathy and compassion.