partridge

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Related to grey partridges: Hungarian partridge, gray partridge

partridge

two genera of gallinaceous game birds (Perdix, Alectoris) in the pheasant family Phasianidae. They are ground feeders and tree perchers. They are poor flyers but can run quickly when disturbed. The common species are the red-legged and the common partridges.
References in periodicals archive ?
The training course, based on a two-year GWCT research project, will provide practical advice on methods of re-establishing a wild grey partridge population in areas where it has either disappeared completely or is hanging on in very small numbers.
A spokeswoman for the Duke admitted it was ironic that the conservation award had been won by work to keep grey partridge numbers healthy for shooting parties.
Unlike pheasants which are bred and released into the wild, it is much more difficult to put down grey partridges for shooting.
Dr Sotherton said more than 1,000 people were counting partridges through the trust and there had been a six-fold increase in grey partridges on the trust's recovery programme on farmland near Royston in Hertfordshire.
Mr Barber created them on sites where he had seen grey partridges, such as near to his grass and cereal margins and wild bird seed mixes.
Farmers and landowners are urged to lend a hand in reversing the decline of the grey partridge.
Figures show wild grey partridges have had their worst breeding season since the trust was founded in 1933.
Conservation work on a North farm is helping to boost the falling population of grey partridges.
Corn buntings and grey partridges have seen numbers drop by more than 90% over 40 years in the face of changes in farming practices, although two specialist farmland bird species - the stock dove and goldfinches - have seen numbers double.
The throaty chuckles of 14 grey partridges in a nearby stubble field showed they had given the beaters the slip - but so many birds in one covey also suggests they were only recently "put down".
It is estimated that in Edwardian Britain there were about one million pairs of grey partridges, but even with the latest 5% increase, the partridge population is currently very low, standing at just 80,000 pairs,' said Dr Nicholas Aebischer, deputy director of research with the GCT.
These areas benefit grey partridges, corn buntings and brown hares.