ray

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ray

 [ra]
a line emanating from a center, as a more or less distinct portion of radiant energy (light or heat), proceeding in a specific direction.
α-r's high-speed helium nuclei ejected from radioactive substances; they have less penetrating power than beta rays. See also alpha particles.
actinic r's light rays that produce chemical action, especially those beyond the violet end of the spectrum.
alpha r's α-rays.
β-r's (beta r's) electrons ejected from radioactive substances with velocities as high as 98 per cent of the velocity of light; they have more penetrating power than alpha rays but less than gamma rays. See also beta particles.
cosmic r's very penetrating radiations that apparently move through interplanetary space in every direction.
digital ray a digit of the hand or foot and corresponding metacarpal or metatarsal bone, regarded as a continuous unit.
γ-r's (gamma r's) a type of electromagnetic radiation emitted by an atomic nucleus during a nuclear reaction; see also gamma rays.
grenz r's very soft electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths of about 2 angstroms.
infrared r's radiations just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum, having wavelengths of 0.75–1000 μm; see also infrared.
medullary ray a cortical extension of a bundle of tubules from a renal pyramid.
roentgen r's x-rays.
ultraviolet r's radiant energy beyond the violet end of the visible spectrum, of wavelengths 0.39 to 0.18 μm; see also ultraviolet rays.
x-r's see x-rays.

ray

(),
1. A beam of light, heat, or other form of radiation. The rays from radium and other radioactive substances are produced by a spontaneous disintegration of the atom; they are electrically charged particles or electromagnetic waves of extremely short wavelength.
2. A part or branch that extends radially from a structure.
[L. radius]

ray

(ra)
1. a line emanating from a center.
2. a more or less distinct portion of radiant energy (light or heat), proceeding in a specific direction.

α-rays , alpha rays high-speed helium nuclei ejected from radioactive substances; they have less penetrating power than beta rays.
β-rays , beta rays electrons ejected from radioactive substances with velocities as high as 0.98 of the velocity of light; they have more penetrating power than alpha rays, but less than gamma rays.
digital ray 
1. a digit of the hand or foot and the corresponding portion of the metacarpus or metatarsus, considered as a continuous structural unit.
2. in the embryo, a mesenchymal condensation of the hand or foot plate that outlines the pattern of a future digit.
γ-rays , gamma rays electromagnetic radiation of short wavelengths emitted by an atomic nucleus during a nuclear reaction, consisting of high-energy photons, having no mass and no electric charge, and traveling with the speed of light and with great penetrating power.
grenz rays  very soft x-rays having wavelengths about 20 nm, lying between x-rays and ultraviolet rays.
medullary rays  the intracortical prolongations of the renal pyramids.
roentgen rays  x-r's.
x-rays  electromagnetic vibrations of short wavelengths (approximately 0.01 to 10 nm) or corresponding quanta that are produced when electrons moving at high velocity impinge on various substances; they are commonly generated by passing high-voltage current (approximately 10,000 volts) through a Coolidge tube. They are able to penetrate most substances to some extent, to affect a photographic plate, to cause certain substances to fluoresce, and to strongly ionize tissue.

ray

Etymology: L, radius
a beam of radiation, such as heat or light, moving away from a source.

Ray, Marilyn Anne

a nursing theorist who introduced the Theory of Bureaucratic Caring, which emphasizes the interconnectedness of nursing care and health care organizations. The theory emphasizes the holistic nature of an organization rather than simple cause-effect relationships of individual actions. Spiritual-ethical caring by nurses, the ultimate goal of which is the promotion of well-being through caring, has a positive effect on health care organizations and can become an economic resource.
A small photon intensity element used to subdivide an intensity-modulated beam for intensity distribution optimisation or dose calculations treatment planning

RAB35

A gene on chromosome 12q24.31 that encodes a member of the Rab subfamily of Ras-related small GTPases, which is involved in endocytosis and is the essential rate-limiting regulator of a fast recycling pathway back to the plasma membrane. During cytokinesis, RAB35 is needed to ensure intercellular bridge stability and abscission.

ray

()
1. A beam of light, heat, or other form of radiation. The rays from radium and other radioactive substances are produced by a spontaneous disintegration of the atom; they are electrically charged particles or electromagnetic waves of extremely short wavelength.
2. A part or branch that extends radially from a structure.
3. One of the grooves of the embryonic hand and foot indicating where the digital rays (e.g., hand rays) will develop.
[L. radius]

ray

  1. see MEDULLARY RAY.
  2. a cartilagenous fish of the genus Raia, closely allied to the skate.
  3. a bony rod supporting the fin of a fish.

ray

forefoot segment, composed of phalanges (of one toe), associated metatarsal, and overlying soft tissues

ray 

In geometrical optics, a straight line representing the direction of propagation of light.
axial ray A ray that is coincident with the axis of an optical system.
chief ray A ray joining an object point to the centre of the entrance pupil of an optical system (Fig. R2). See pencil of light.
emergent ray A ray of light in image space either after reflection (reflected ray) or after refraction (refracted ray).
extraordinary ray See birefringence.
incident ray A ray of light in object space that strikes a reflecting or refracting surface.
marginal ray A ray joining the axial point of an object to the edge or margin of an aperture or pupil (Fig. R2).
ordinary ray See birefringence.
paraxial ray A light ray that forms an angle of incidence so small that its value in radians is almost equal to its sine or its tangent. (i.e. sin θ = θ or tan θ = θ. These are approximate expressions referred to as the paraxial approximation (or the gaussian approximation). See paraxial optics; paraxial region; gaussian theory.
principal ray A ray joining the extreme off-axis object point to the centre of the entrance pupil or aperture (Fig. R2).
ray tracing Technique used in optical computation consisting of tracing the paths of light rays through an optical system by graphical methods or by using formulae. Nowadays, computer methods are used. See sign convention.
Fig. R2 Rays of light incident to the eye (E, centre of the entrance pupil of the eye)enlarge picture
Fig. R2 Rays of light incident to the eye (E, centre of the entrance pupil of the eye)

Table R1 Differences between the sine and the tangent values of various angles (in degrees and radians). The error is calculated between the sine value and the value in radians and between the value in radians and the tangent value
angle (deg)angle (rad)sine
value
tangent valueerror (%) sine errorerror (%) tangent error
0.50.008 7270.008 7270.008 7270.000.00
10.017 4530.017 4520.017 4550.010.01
20.034 9070.034 8990.034 9210.020.04
30.052 3600.052 3360.052 4080.050.09
40.069 8130.069 7560.069 9270.080.16
50.087 2660.087 1560.087 4890.130.25
60.104 7200.104 5280.105 1040.180.37
70.122 1730.121 8690.122 7850.250.50
80.139 6260.139 1730.140 5410.330.65
100.174 5330.173 6480.176 3270.511.03
150.261 7990.258 8190.267 9491.152.35
5200.349 0660.342 0200.363 9702.064.27
300.523 5990.500 0000.577 3504.7210.27

ray

()
1. Beam of light, heat, or other form of radiation.
2. A part or branch that extends radially from a structure.
[L. radius]

ray(s),

n a line of light, heat, or other form of radiant energy. A ray is a more or less distinct or isolated portion of radiant energy, whereas the word
rays is a very general term for any form of radiant energy, whether vibratory or particulate.
ray, alpha,
ray, beta,
ray, cathode,
ray, central,
n the center of a radiographic beam.
ray, cosmic,
n radiation that originates outside the earth's atmosphere. Cosmic rays have extremely short wavelengths. They are able to produce ionization as they pass through the air and other matter and are capable of penetrating many feet of material such as lead and rock. The primary cosmic rays probably consist of atomic nuclei (mainly protons), some of which may have energies of the order of 1010 to 1015 eV. Secondary cosmic rays are produced when the primary cosmic rays interact with nuclei and electrons (e.g., in the earth's atmosphere). Secondary cosmic rays consist mainly of mesons, protons, neutrons, electrons, and photons that have less energy than the primary rays. Practically all the primary cosmic rays are absorbed in the upper atmosphere. Almost all cosmic radiation observed at the earth's surface is of the secondary type.
ray, gamma,
n photons with a shorter wavelength than those ordinarily used in diagnostic medical and dental radiography and that originate in the nuclei of atoms. A quantum of electromagnetic radiation emitted by a nucleus as a result of a quantum transition between two energy levels of the nucleus; e.g., as a radioisotope decays, it gives off energy, some of which may be in the form of gamma radiation.
ray, grenz
n roentgen rays that are greater in length than 1 Å; used in radiography of soft tissues, insects, flowers, and microscopic sections of teeth and surrounding tissues. These rays are the result of using approximately 10 to 20 kV in a specially constructed radiation-generating device. They have a wavelength of about 2 Å.
ray, neutron,
n particulate ionizing radiation consisting of neutrons. On impact with nuclei or atoms, neutrons possess enough kinetic energy to set the nuclei or atoms in motion with sufficient velocity to ionize matter or enter into nuclear reactions that result in the emission of ionizing radiation. The former variety is usually called the fast neutron, and the latter the thermoneutron, with gradations of epithermal and slow neutrons between them.
ray, roentgen (r)
n an international unit based on the ability of radiation to ionize air. The exposure to x- or gamma radiation such that the associated corpuscular emission per 0.001293 g of air produces, in air, ions carrying 1 esu of quantity of electricity of either sign (2.083 billion ion pairs).

ray

a line emanating from a center, as a more or less distinct portion of radiant energy (light or heat), proceeding in a specific direction.

alpha r's,
α-r's high-speed helium nuclei ejected from radioactive substances; they have less penetrating power than beta rays. See also alpha particles.
beta r's,
β-r's, beta particles electrons ejected from radioactive substances with velocities as high as 0.98 of the velocity of light; they have more penetrating power than alpha rays, but less than gamma rays.
digital ray
a digit of the hand or foot and corresponding metacarpal or metatarsal bone, regarded as a continuous unit.
ray fungus
branched filamentous appearance of Actinomyces bovis in granules in pus.
gamma r's,
γ-r's electromagnetic radiation of short wavelengths emitted by an atomic nucleus during a nuclear reaction, consisting of high-energy photons, having no mass and no electric charge, and traveling with the speed of light and with great penetrating power.
They have very great range in penetrating tissues and cytotoxic effects, especially on nuclei and on tissues which are replicating rapidly. The fetus, bone marrow, blood, liver and gonads are particularly susceptible. See also radiation injury, radiation therapy.
medullary ray
a cortical extension of a bundle of tubules from a renal pyramid.
roentgen r's
x-rays.
x-r's
see x-ray.

Patient discussion about ray

Q. Is an X- Ray dangerous to my fetus? I fell down while I am pregnant and was sent to the ER. I was given an x- ray there, is the radiation dangerous to my fetus?

A. As far as I know one x-ray cannot harm your fetus since there is not enough radiation there to harm it. If you are worried consult a Doctor.

Q. What does radiation do for cancer patients? We found out today that my grandmother has cancer and my mother said that the oncologist is planning on using radiation to ease her pain. My question is, what does radiation do? I know, eases pain, but how?

A. hello;radiation therapy/an anticancer drugs are used to suppress or arrest the rate of cell division in any tumor cells, the rad also kills good cells also.

Q. Is it proven that cellular radiation can damage health?

A. it was proven that people that talk a lot with cellular phones tend to develop problems in their salivary gland (the Parotid gland, right under the ear)that is on the side they speak the most.
http://www.newsinferno.com/archives/2163

could be that in 15 years from now the amount of brain cancer will increase and they will know for sure it's from cellular phones. , why take a chance- use as less as possible, use an earphone and don't give a cellular phone to your children until they are 17.
you can never know what will they find next...

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