greensickness


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greensickness

(grēn′sĭk′nĭs)
n.

green′sick′ adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The concept of greensickness may indeed be present in the play but Shakespeare's contribution to social development is that he shows his characters battling against conventional knowledge and prejudices.
For example, in Partridge's tract, remedies were given for both greensickness and for an absence of bloody flux, but they were not regarded as the same, greensickness being a name used to describe the absence of menstruation in females and the patients requiring a bloody flux being identified as male.
In a fascinating discussion of greensickness or "the virgin's disease," Paster shows that the demand that fathers release their daughters to future husbands, paired with the demand that young women release themselves from an assumed natural reluctance to be courted, resulted in a kind of psychosocial disease that afflicted young women.