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green

 [grēn]
1. a color between yellow and blue, produced by energy with wavelengths between 490 and 570 nm.
2. a dye or stain with this color.
indocyanine green a dye used intravenously in determination of blood volume and flow, cardiac output, and hepatic function.

green

(grēn),
A color between blue and yellow in the spectrum. For individual green dyes, see specific names.

green

(grēn)
1. a color between yellow and blue, produced by energy with wavelengths between 490 and 570 nm.
2. a dye or stain with this color.

indocyanine green  a dye used intravenously in determination of blood volume and flow, cardiac output, and hepatic function.
Drug slang A regional term for inferior quality marijuana, PCP, or ketamine
Global village Environmentally ‘correct’
Quackery A colour in the pseudoscience of colour therapy which is said to be mentally and physically soothing and regarded by colour ‘therapists’ as the master healer; it is said to disinfect and rebuild tissues, reduce blood pressure, treat stress, fatigue, and cancer, and provide hope
Vox populi A colour wavelength in the interval from 560 to 490 nm with a frequency interval of 540 to 610 THz

PDR

Physicians Desk Reference A book published annually that lists all ± 2500 US therapeutics requiring a physician prescription
PDR 7 color-coded sections
White Manufacturers' index, containing the company addresses and list of products
Pink Product name index, an alphabetical listing of the drugs by brand name
Blue Product classification, where drugs are subdivided into therapeutic classes
Yellow Generic and chemical name index
Multicolored Photographs of the most commonly prescribed tablets and capsules
White Product information, a reprint of the manufacturers' product inserts and
Green Diagnostic product information, a list of manufacturers of diagnostic tests used in office practice and the hospital; Cf Over-the-counter drugs  . ;.

green,

adj in Chinese medicine, a facial coloration that indicates poor, sluggish digestion, particularly when accompanied by a muddy look in the eyes.

green

The hue sensation evoked by stimulating the retina with rays of wavelength 490-560 nm and situated between blue and yellow. The complementary colour of green is a non-spectral colour situated in the red-purple region.

green

1. a composite color made by mixing blue and yellow; the color of young grass.
2. untrained.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increases in residential surrounding greenness (NDVI) in all buffer areas during the first 4-5 y of life were associated with lower K-CPT omission errors and HRT-SE (Table 3).
Most importantly, improving this aspect of campus form is more feasible and economical than improving greenness or urbanism.
As they stand now, the concluding paragraphs make a rather strained leap to, for example, the Japanese concept of "forest bathing" (137) and the art form of moving trees (138-9), as forms of contemporary commentary on greenness that has caught the interest of the author.
Using this process, we set up the greenness score attribute field as a weighted factor to compute the shortest or greenest route between the points.
The overall greenness of forest products advertising will decline in the 2001 to 2005 period compared to the 1995 to 1999 period as advertisers improve ability to segment markets.
Henrik came through to challenge on the rails inside the final two furlongs as Motivator, having only his second run, showed some signs of greenness.
Peter Dombrovskis's wonderful photo of Rock Island Bend on the August 2003 Habitat cover also brought back memories of an important step in my conversion to greenness.
The sense of swirling--a demiurgic maelstrom--informs all the sculptures here, even the implicitly figural; the vaguely nauseating, excitingly exotic, mottled jungle greenness of Green Early Forms, 2003, suggests it could have come out of some primordial ooze.
That's produced a more robust cabernet free of the greenness, or vegetal flavors, so common in Chilean cabs.
It is our hope that communities will peruse their records, talk with their oldest citizens, and then find and rededicate or restore these memorials, remembering their original intent, as described in the pages of this magazine more than 80 years ago: "The trees will be, in their very greenness and robust strength, reminders of the youths who gave their vigor to win the big war.