greenhouse effect


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Related to greenhouse effect: Greenhouse gases, global warming

greenhouse effect

a theorized change in the earth's climate caused by accumulation of solar heat in the earth's surface and atmosphere. Human activity contributes increasing amounts of the so-called greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and chlorofluorocarbon, to the atmosphere. Some of the particles and gases in the atmosphere also allow more sunlight to filter through to the earth's surface but reflect much of the radiant infrared energy that otherwise would escape through the atmosphere back into space. See also global warming.

greenhouse effect

Planetary warming as a result of the trapping of solar energy beneath atmospheric gases. The composition and concentration of the gases in the atmosphere influence the earth's surface temperature because some gases more effectively retain heat than others. Fossil fuel combustion, which has increased at a rapid rate since the 1950s, has deposited increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the upper atmosphere. This is thought to be a contributory factor in global warming, a phenomenon suspected of having widespread effects on all ecosystems. See: global warming; ozone

greenhouse effect

The progressive earth-heating effect resulting from the transparency of the atmosphere to sun (solar) radiation at high frequencies and its relative opacity to energy re-radiated by the earth at a lower, less penetrative, frequency. Water vapour and carbon dioxide are the main elements concerned, and any increase in these, mainly from the burning of fossil fuels, enhances the heating effect. A rise in surface temperature could melt polar ice and cause widespread flooding.

greenhouse effect

  1. an effect occurring in greenhouses in which the glass transmits short wavelengths but absorbs and re-radiates longer wavelengths, thus heating the interior.
  2. the application of this effect to the earth's atmosphere. Infrared radiation tends to be trapped by carbon dioxide and water vapour in the earth's atmosphere and some of it is re-radiated back to the earth's surface.
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Boon (2010) found pre-service teachers' conceptual understanding of the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer similar to secondary students, including those with science and environmental studies as their major teaching area.
Methane is 20 times more efficient at trapping the sun's energy in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide, thereby being a major cause of the greenhouse effect.
All those anthropogenic causes are distinct from the enhanced greenhouse effect and occur along with ever-present natural variability, which is also a topic of intense research.
This index is useful because it should accurately express the contribution of each gas to the total greenhouse effect and allow for comparisons between the warming effects of different gases.
Keeping food cold but easily accessible is a resource-intensive undertaking, involving electricity, compressor motors, and insulation, as well as gases such as hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons, which contribute to ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect.
Alarm bells over the greenhouse effect first came from a Swedish scientist, Svante Arrhenius in 1896.
We're not saying that aerosols can counteract the greenhouse effect," says lead scientist Stephen Schwartz, an atmospheric chemist at Brookhaven, "but rather that we need to know how much of a cooling effect they have so we have a clearer picture of the greenhouse effect.
Environmentalists will find familiar ground reading about early concepts of population pressure, the greenhouse effect, DDT, the green revolution, genetic engineering, cloning and the diversity of life.
Carbon dioxide is a leading cause of the greenhouse effect.
The city of Lyons is to undertake a district heating trial using biogas, an unprecedented process in France, which allows energy savings and falls within the context of the fight against the greenhouse effect.
2] from the atmosphere, thus reducing the greenhouse effect.