greater trochanter


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Related to greater trochanter: Gluteal tuberosity

great·er tro·chan·ter

[TA]
a strong process at the proximal and lateral part of the shaft of the femur, overhanging the root of the neck; it gives attachment to the gluteus medius and minimus, piriformis, obturator internus and externus, and gemelli muscles.
Synonym(s): trochanter major [TA]

greater trochanter

n.
A strong process overhanging the root of the neck of the femur, giving attachment to the middle and least gluteal muscles as well as other muscles that control thigh movement.

greater trochanter

a large projection of the femur, to which are attached various muscles, including the gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and obturator internus. The greater trochanter projects from the angle formed by the neck and body of the femur.

great·er tro·chan·ter

(grā'tĕr trō-kan'tĕr)
A strong process at the proximal and lateral part of the shaft of the femur, overhanging the root of the neck; it gives attachment to the gluteus medius and minimus, piriformis, obturator internus and externus, and gemelli muscles.
Synonym(s): trochanter major [TA] .

trochanter major

; greater trochanter bony prominence adjacent to root of neck of femur, palpable at lateral aspect of hip joint
References in periodicals archive ?
The gluteus medius muscle converges and attaches on the superoposterior facet and lateral facet on the greater trochanter.
Any increase in this tension combined with repetitive motion can result in increased friction over the greater trochanter that may result in irritation and inflammation of the trochanteric bursa, as well as chronic degenerative changes with associated fibrosis.
It allows for the assessment of acetabular coverage of the femoral head, femoral head sphericity, (67) the contour of the femoral head-neck junction, the height of the greater trochanter, position of the joint center, the joint space, and Shenton's line.
The morbidity of the relative lengthening procedure, including healing problems of the greater trochanter, is quite small.
Two guiding wires adjusted through the osteogroove were placed parallelly under the greater trochanter.
On six-month follow-up, the fracture of the greater trochanter had healed, and the patient was ambulating unassisted and pain free.
It was found to be present about 7 cm below the tip of the greater trochanter (Figure--1) and on careful measurement with a measuring tape, the bony projection was found to be about 1.
A small incision is made above the greater trochanter and the guide wire is passed in thru the fracture site in a trochanteric fracture and from the tip of greater trochanter in a sub trochanteric fracture.
Fracture of the greater trochanter during insertion of the nail was seen in one patient, and treated conservatively.
Communition of greater trochanter: Communition of greater trochanter leads to technical difficulty in passing nail and nail entry point may get lateralized, and tip of trochanter can get splayed.
Materials and methods: The CDPR was developed to establish a fixed point on the pelvis that would remain constant throughout the procedure and from which the distance to the greater trochanter could be measured prior to dislocation of the hip.

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