mullein

(redirected from great mullein)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mullein

Herbal medicine
A biennial herb that contains flavonoids, glycosides (aucubin), mucilage, saponins and volatile oil, which is anti-inflammatory, diuretic, expectorant and sedative. Mullein is used to treat respiratory conditions (such as asthma, bronchitis, colds and whooping cough), insomnia, urinary tract infections and rheumatic pain; it has been used topically for skin inflammation and infections, haemorrhoids, and earaches.
 
Toxicity
Mullein should not be used in patients with cancer, as it has cancer-promoting activity; it should not be used in pregnancy or while nursing, as the seeds are toxic.

mullein (muˑ·ln),

n Latin names:
Verbascum thapsus, Verbasci flos; parts used: dried leaves, flowers; uses: antiviral, antioxidant, expectorant, antitussive, respiratory complaints, urinary infections, ear infections; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children. Also called
Aaron's rod, bunny's ears, candle-wick, flannel-leaf, great mullein, or
Jacob's-staff.

mullein

a plant in the genus Verbascum spp.
References in periodicals archive ?
25th: Signs of fall coming: rows of lanky great mulleins black and gone to seed, pokeweed the size of small trees with purple stalks and berries, the panicled dogwood with white fruit and leaves fading pink.
When thimbleberry, blueweed, great Indian plantain, great mullein, milkweed, black-eyed Susan, columbine, red bleeding heart, dock, daisy fleabane, bush clover, yellow and white sweet clover, cow parsnip, blue-eyed grass, and Hooker's orchis flower in the Appalachians, then strawberry season is at its best in the Pacific Northwest.
Hosta spears and lily-of-the-valley will be six to nine inches, poison ivy and Virginia creeper two inches, mint and dock and great mullein and comfrey eight inches, Dutch iris twelve inches, cattails and pokeweed up to twenty-four.