grey

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grey

Vox populi
adjective Referring to an older person, usually at or near the age of retirement.

Turner,

George Grey, English surgeon, 1877-1951.
Grey Turner sign - local areas of discoloration about the umbilicus and in the region of the loins, in acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis and other causes of retroperitoneal hemorrhage.

grey

A colour said to be achromatic or without hue. It varies in magnitude from white to black. Note: also spelt gray.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the above analysis, the most of smokes usually display grayish colors, as shown in Fig.
GE Plastics buys the flake material, mixes it with virgin plastic and creates a grayish plastic pellet it calls "LEXAN REL 350.
Avoid: Bruised fruit, discolored skins, or a dull, grayish appearance.
One stage is represented by banded, white sterile quartz with "comb structure": another consists of chalcedonic quartz with sparse amethystine quartz -- also sterile; and the last composed of grayish or "shadowed" quartz associated with metallic sulphides and sulfosalts of silver, and with sulphides of lead, zinc, iron, the latter associated with gold.
Forewing ground color grayish white, median area and distal half of basal area dark brown.
2 reactor at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station Monday afternoon, while grayish smoke that was seen rising from the building of the No.
The grayish image on the bottom left shows Thakur as the eye would see it, while the bottom right image combines visible light and near-infrared data taken through 11 filters in a manner that reveals compositional differences in Mercury's rocks.
On a side street in Norwalk, Connecticut, just a block from fully rigged sailboats bobbing in the harbor, Soundkeeper Terry Backer pulled back the grill on a storm drain and revealed a mesh box hanging from four straps and sagging under the weight of grayish sand.
During surgery, grayish necrotic fascia, extensive subcutaneous tissue necrosis, loss of resistance of the normally adherent superficial fascia to blunt dissection, and foul-smelling "dishwater" pus were noted.
Like most shipwreck artifacts, the cannons were found covered with a grayish concretion, an inch-thick, rock-hard crust of sand, salt, and calcium carbonate, a chemical compound found in seashells.
Signs of heat exhaustion include gradual weakness, nausea, anxiety, excess sweating, faintness, and pale, grayish, clammy skin.
Most of the flowering plants also have soft green to grayish foliage; the variety of shades and textures forms in interesting tapestry even during the brief periods without bloom.