gravitation

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grav·i·ta·tion

(grav'i-tā'shŭn),
The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l -2, where G (newtonian constant of gravitation) = 6.67259 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2, m1 and m2 are the masses (in kg) of the two bodies, and l is the distance separating them in meters.
[L. gravitas, weight]

gravitation

(grăv″ĭ-tā′shŭn) [L. gravitas, weight]
The force and movement tending to draw every particle of matter together, esp. the attraction of the earth for bodies at a distance from its center.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many m values for the gravitationally bound system will be unoccupied, for the occupancy of the specific QCM orbits depends upon the history of formation and the subsequent evolution of the planetary system.
Specifically, the observed X-ray polarization of a gravitationally microlensed quasar should vary rapidly with time if the gravitational Faraday effect indeed exists," he said.
The consequence is that the S-stars seem to be in their own nearly isolated QCM gravitationally bound system within the larger system of the Galaxy and the Galaxy bulge.
Astronomers believe that something similar may have happened with IC 3583, which is gravitationally interacting with Messier 90 - an intermediate spiral galaxy located roughly 60 million light-years away.
2], which has been very successful in explaining the rotation and luminosity curves of individual galaxies but has large discrepancies for galaxy clusters [2] in both the cluster core and in the outer regions; (3) quantum celestial mechanics (QCM) derived [3] from the general relativistic Hamilton-Jacobi equation which dictates that all gravitationally bound systems have quantization states.
Its wide-field imager will search for Type la supernovae and gravitationally lensed galaxies in an effort to better understand cosmic expansion, complementing the upcoming European Space Agency's Euclid mission.
The Sun should also be pulling in rocks that get too close, gravitationally crushing them into a thin disc, which gradually and continually dopes the remnant atmosphere with silicon.
In the case of the Milky Way and Andromeda, the two galaxies are massive enough and close enough that they are gravitationally attracted to one another.
Astronomers think that clusters organize themselves in this way via dynamical relaxation: when two stars interact gravitationally, the less massive star gets nudged farther out and is eventually expelled to the cluster's edges.
The Fomalhaut team led by Kalas considers this circumstantial evidence there may be other planet-like bodies in the system that gravitationally disturbed Fomalhaut b to place it in such a highly eccentric orbit.
Galaxies such as Segue 1, which have such a tiny amount of visible material to gravitationally disturb the dark matter, are the best places to reveal the true distribution and nature of the unseen material.
While moving at random and not gravitationally bound, the hot, young stars of spectral type O and B in Scorpius, Centaurus, and Crux have astrophysical importance as the nearest OB association to our Sun.