gravitational field


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Related to gravitational field: Gravitational field strength

gravitational field

The region in space in which the attractive effects of a given mass have an effect.
See also: field
References in periodicals archive ?
Time variation of proper mass should result in the radiation of energy possibly in the form of gravitational waves or radiation that can propagate in space-time with or without gravitational field.
The theory also predicted that light rays will be bent by strong gravitational fields.
alpha][beta]], the stress-energy tensor of gravitational field [U.
The movement in uniform gravitational field can be decomposed in two linear movements: a uniform one on horizontal line and a uniform varied one on the vertical.
The wound up gravitational field eventually stops and unravels which sends the planet off in an opposite spin.
Experiments with this systems are interesting because the system operates inside the gravitational field of the earth, and the total mechanical energy, potential system may consist of three different forms of energy, namely gravitational potential energy, potential energy stored in the spring, and kinetic energy.
The effect of the two classical singularities (/ pseudo-singularities) of the Schwarzschild solution on the quantum wave function for the gravitational field is studied using a wave function initially localized on the classical solution.
The star was being yanked around by the gravitational field of not one, not two, but three planets
The good news is there are a few stars capable of penetrating The Great One's gravitational field.
One example: Nerlich claims that in General Relativity Theory gravitational forces are completely geometricized in the sense that the trajectory of a massive body in a gravitational field is described as that of a "force-free body" (p.
The only way to figure his popularity is there's an undiscovered element of physics where people's opinions are being sucked into his gravitational field.
Einstein had predicted that light rising against a gravitational field would lose energy so that it would redden slightly (see 1916).