gravitation

(redirected from gravitational)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

grav·i·ta·tion

(grav'i-tā'shŭn),
The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l -2, where G (newtonian constant of gravitation) = 6.67259 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2, m1 and m2 are the masses (in kg) of the two bodies, and l is the distance separating them in meters.
[L. gravitas, weight]

gravitation

(grăv″ĭ-tā′shŭn) [L. gravitas, weight]
The force and movement tending to draw every particle of matter together, esp. the attraction of the earth for bodies at a distance from its center.
References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;Those different scenarios produce different sets of gravitational waves.
She said the journey of gravitational waves starting from Newton had reached its optimal level in the time of Einstein.
The gravitational wave signal was emitted from the collision of two neutron stars 130 million lightyears from Earth.
Professor B S Sathyaprakash, also of the School of Physics and Astronomy, said: "The first discovery of gravitational waves took weeks before we could confirm it, but this event was truly a 'eureka' moment.
When two neutron stars collide, there are two consequences theorists have predicted: The stars would generate the elements heavier than nickel and iron on the periodic table, and emit gravitational waves as they spiral inward.
Such an achievement would allow experts to better pinpoint the origin of gravitational waves and therefore pursue further studies into gravity itself.
Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time that propagate outward from intensely violent and energetic processes in space.
Black holes are regions so dense with matter that not even photons of light can escape their gravitational pull.
A team of astronomers recently announced their observations of these gravitational ripples in the fabric of spacetime that have, at long last, reached Earth from their distant origin--an ancient catastrophic event in a remote region of the universe.
mergers and how gravitational waves are possible during such events.
The search for gravitational waves has been the centre of current research in Astronomy and Cosmology.
After Pakistan-born scientist Dr Nergis Mavalvala made waves for being a member of the team of scientists that discovered gravitational waves (ripples in space and time hypothesised by physicist Albert Einstein a century ago), it has emerged another Pakistani was also part of the team.