Xanthorrhoea

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Xanthorrhoea

Australian plant genus in the family Xanthorrhoeaceae; contains an unidentified toxin which causes posterior incoordination (wamps) with urinary incontinence in cattle; have also caused red coloration of urine; flower spikes most toxic. Includes X. australis, X. fulva (X. hastile, X. hastilis), X. johnsonii, X. minor subsp. lutea. Also called grasstree, blackboy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grass trees are a great example, having a skirt of long, thin leaves, with a flower spike emerging from the centre bearing numerous, small, white flowers that attract the pollinating visitors.
But perhaps more intriguingly, the histories of lesser-known remedies such as those extracted from native orchids, banksias and grass trees are also brought alive in this text.
What the Aussies and the Kiwis once saw as little more than weeds - those marvellous tree ferns (Dicksonia antartica and Cyathea australis), the grass trees, the New Zealand flax (phormiums) and bottle brushes (callistemons) - and dumped on the tip with the rest of the week's garden refuse, we are importing in increasing quantities.