grasp

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GRASP

 
a patient classification system.

grasp

(grasp),
The act of taking securely and holding firmly.

grasp

(grasp)
To seize or clasp, especially with the hand.
[M.E. graspen]

grasp

(grasp)
The act of taking securely and holding firmly.
[M.E. graspen]

grasp,

n the manner in which an instrument is held.
grasp, finger,
n a modification of the palm and thumb grasp; it is more useful with modern, smaller handled instruments. The handle is held by the four flexed fingers rather than allowed to rest in the palm, and the thumb is used to secure a rest. Used when working indirectly on the maxillary arch.
grasp, instrument,
n a method of holding the instrument with the fingers in such a manner that freedom of action, control, tactile sensitivity, and maneuverability are secured. The most common grasp is the pen grasp.
grasp, modified pen,
n a method for holding instruments that is designed to enhance control and sensitivity. The grasp consists of the tips of the thumb, index finger, and middle finger holding the instrument while the ring finger provides support. See also grasp, pen.
grasp, palm-and-thumb,
n a grasp that is similar to the hold on a knife when one is whittling wood; the handle rests in the palm and is grasped by the four fingers, while the thumb rests on an adjoining object.
grasp, pen,
n a grasp in which the instrument is held somewhat as a pen is held, with the handle in contact with the bulbous portion of the thumb and index finger and the shank in contact with the radial side of the bulbous portion of the middle finger (not crossing the nail), while the handle rests against the phalanx of the index finger.
grasp, pincer,
n the grasping an object between the thumb and forefinger. The ability to perform this task is a milestone of fine motor development in infants, usually occurring from 9 to 12 months of age.
References in periodicals archive ?
From this decision issue surprisingly powerful repercussions; it pressurizes each picture, introduces gravity, literally grounds floating, immaterial hue in what seems like graspable body weight.
Not only did these evoke Jeff Koons considerably more than the downtown show did Nauman, their surfaces were uninvolving and their points quickly graspable.
When Welchman lays out his material, he does so in a graspable way.
That Burger finally furnished a graspable model of the avant-garde to set against Greenberg's was always a prime reason for the academy's interest in his work.
On the one hand, a unified, immediately graspable visual motif has been produced by the unfolding of procedures in stages, and on the other, an apparently complex and varied surface can be created "in one stroke," or at least very quickly.
Kierkegaard nevertheless poses "a radical challenge to secular ethicists" because, for him, what is good or right involves "transcendence" and so is not necessarily graspable by reason, i.
i) Declarative sentences express truth-evaluable contents (that is, propositions); (ii) such contents are determinately fixed by the syntax and lexical content of the constituents of a sentence; (iii) context-sensitive expressions are limited to a small overt set; and (iv) the contents as expressed by a speaker are graspable by a competent hearer without access to the intentions of the speaker.
31) For example, the coffee sleeve attached to the carry-out cup of coffee on my desk could be described as either "a cardboard band encircling a paper cup" (a purely structural limitation or description of the technology) or "a device that provides at least a ten degree temperature reduction between a hot liquid and an outer graspable surface" (a largely functional limitation or description of the technology).
The understated, contemporary design of Trex Reveal is a strong fit for multi-family housing and commercial settings - and may be installed with continuously graspable stair rail options for safety, comfort and code compliance.
It appears, and perhaps appears to be graspable, but always slips through the fingers" (69).
It turns out that literature--and here I speak not only of novels and poems, but also of subgenres such as autobiography (Benvenuto Cellini's Life, written some time in the 1550s but only translated into English in 1822, looms large in Betjemann's monograph as a kind of urtext for subsequent investigations) and forms such as the magazine (Gustav Stickley's The Craftsman, which represented the aesthetic and material ideals of the Craftsman Furniture Company of New York, is the subject of Betjemann's penultimate chapter)--is peculiarly capable of commenting upon artisanship and translating its vagaries into a graspable language.
Alongside critical reflection on the state-of-the-art, it proposes a graspable and audible alternative to traditional understandings of interpretation in musical performance.