graphology

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graph·ol·o·gy

(graf-ol'ŏ-jē),
The study of handwriting as an indication of temperament, character, or personality.
[grapho- + G. logos, study]

graphology

(gră-fŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of handwriting, especially when employed as a means of analyzing character.

graph′o·log′i·cal (grăf′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
gra·phol′o·gist n.

graphology

(grăf-ŏl′ō-jē) [″ + logos, word, reason]
The examination of handwriting, used to diagnose or analyze personality.
References in periodicals archive ?
In principle, we could compare the relative effects of two devices of a similar type, such as the graphological devices of italicisation and capitalisation.
One of the ways he does this is by creating cohesive patterns at syntactic and graphological levels of literary style.
Those clusters that correlate lowest with reading are not graphological and generally are acquired naturally without instruction.
At the graphological level, all instances of italicization, capitalization and punctuation are largely used to portray setting and characters.
Thus, the researcher cannot rely on a direct correlation between a graphological assessment and a measure of job performance to establish validity.
seem obsessed, even oppressed by the enormous weight of paleographical and graphological apparatus left over from that great positivistic enterprise.
In a minority of cases, however, the (F)DT can involve quotation marks or a graphological equivalent.
On aspects of the Six Dynasties period perception of calligraphy as an "externalization of the writer's mind and personality," allowing a graphological interpretation, see Harrist 1999: 4.
The literacy session took place each morning for approximately two hours and involved teaching and learning practices such as shared reading, graphological and phonemic awareness, literary discussions, small group work and individual student conferences with the teacher.
1) The literary historian deals with the written text, a coded, graphological representation of thought, which may or may not be an actual record of an oral, pre-literate or illiterate performance.
In any case, whether or not Canaanite scribes possessed comparable grammatical theory, they would appear to have possessed fairly sophisticated linguistic and graphological understanding in order to use the cuneiform writing system to encode Canaanite by means of Akkadian.
He compares these notations with prosody and versification; they are not simply graphological peculiarities.