granulocytopenia


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granulocytopenia

 [gran″u-lo-si″to-pe´ne-ah]
a reduction in the number of granular leukocytes in the blood that is less severe than agranulocytosis; called also granulopenia.

gran·u·lo·cy·to·pe·ni·a

(gran'yū-lō-sī'tō-pē'nē-ă),
Fewer than the normal number of granular leukocytes in the blood.
[granulocyte + G. penia, poverty]

granulocytopenia

/gran·u·lo·cy·to·pe·nia/ (gran″u-lo-si″-to-pe´ne-ah) reduction in the number of granular leukocytes in the blood.

granulocytopenia

[gran′yo̅o̅lōsī′tōpē′nē·ə]
Etymology: L, granulum + Gk, kytos, cell, penia, poverty
an abnormal decrease in the total number of granulocytes in the blood. Also called granulopenia, neutropenia. Compare granulocytosis. See also leukopenia. granulocytopenic, adj.

Agranulocytosis

A marked decrease in neutrophils < 500/mm3; it is loosely equivalent to neutropaenia in the working parlance.
Artiology Acquired due to prescription drugs—chloramphenicol, clozapine, nitrous oxide, procainamide, sulfonamides, thiazide diuretics.
Clinical findings Fever, malaise, mucocutaneous ulcers (throat, GI tract, skin).

granulocytopenia

Agranulocytosis, see there.

gran·u·lo·cy·to·pe·ni·a

(gran'yū-lō-sī'tō-pē'nē-ă)
Less than the normal number of granular leukocytes in the blood.
Synonym(s): granulopenia.
[granulocyte + G. penia, poverty]

granulocytopenia

Deficiency of GRANULOCYTES in the blood.

granulocytopenia (granˈ·yu·lō·sīˈ·t·pēˑ·nē·),

n decreased volume of granulocytes in the blood. Also called
granulopenia or
neutropenia.

gran·u·lo·cy·to·pe·ni·a

(gran'yū-lō-sī'tō-pē'nē-ă)
Fewer than normal number of granular leukocytes in the blood.
[granulocyte + G. penia, poverty]

granulocytopenia (gran´ūlōsī´tōpē´nēə),

n a deficiency in the number of granulocytic cells in the bloodstream. See also agranulocytosis.

granulocytopenia

References in periodicals archive ?
In patients with a lower risk of experiencing granulocytopenia, if CBC could be checked with longer intervals during initial treatment stages, the patients would have better compliance with this drug's treatment protocol.
Granulocytopenia resolved after 34 days, and a bone marrow aspirate showed complete remission of leukemia.
The most common adverse events reported for INFERGEN during clinical studies were headache (82%), fatigue (69%), fever (61%), myalgia (58%), rigors (57%), body pain (54%), arthralgia (51%), nausea (40%), insomnia (39%), pharyngitis (34%), nervousness (31%), infection upper respiratory (31%), diarrhea (29%), depression (26%), anorexia (24%), injection site erythema (23%), granulocytopenia (23%), dizziness (22%), cough (22%), dyspepsia (21%), thrombocytopenia (19%), anxiety (19%), sinusitis (17%), influenza-like symptoms (15%) and leucopenia (15%).
The incidence of this disease is increasing in the entire scope of patients with severe granulocytopenia, including hematologic malignancies, solid tumors receiving high-dose chemotherapy, and profound neutropenic sites such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
Gentamicin (5 mg/kg) was given if the patient had normal BUN and creatine levels, no history of either renal disease or granulocytopenia, and was not pregnant.
Unexplained fever and/or decrease in white cell count, particularly during the initial 3 months of therapy, warrant consideration of possible Agranulocytosis or granulocytopenia.
severe granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, or a combination thereof).
Because of the risk of agranulocytosis and granulocytopenia associated with the use of clozapine, Alamo Pharmaceuticals has developed the FazaClo Patient Registry.
At the recommended dosage, IV Busulfex produced profound myelosuppression in all patients (ie, severe granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia, or a combination thereof).
FazaClo requires a Patient Registry because of the risk of rare, but severe adverse events such as agranulocytosis and granulocytopenia associated with the use of clozapine.