granulation


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Related to granulation: granulation tissue

granulation

 [gran″u-la´shun]
1. the process of forming granulation tissue.
2. the process of forming cytoplasmic granules.
3. granule (def. 1).
4. any granular material on the surface of a tissue, membrane, or organ.
5. the rendering of hard or metallic substances into granules or grains.
arachnoid g's enlarged arachnoid villi projecting into the venous sinuses and creating slight depressions on the inner surface of the cranium.
exuberant g's excessive proliferation of granulation tissue in the healing of a wound.

gran·u·la·tion

(gran'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. Formation into grains or granules; the state of being granular.
See also: granulation tissue.
2. A granular mass in or on the surface of any organ or membrane; one of the individual granules that form the mass.
See also: granulation tissue.
3. The formation of minute, rounded, fleshy connective tissue projections on the surface of a wound, ulcer, or inflamed tissue surface in the process of healing; one of the fleshy granules composing this surface.
See also: granulation tissue.
4. In pharmacy, the formation of crystals by constant agitation of a supersaturated solution of a salt; product used in the manufacture of tablets for oral use.
Synonym(s): granulatio
[L. granulatio]

granulation

/gran·u·la·tion/ (-shun)
1. the division of a hard substance into small particles.
2. the formation in wounds of small, rounded masses of tissue during healing; also the mass so formed.

arachnoidal granulations , cerebral granulations enlarged arachnoid villi projecting into the venous sinuses and creating slight depressions on the surface of the cranium.
exuberant granulations  excessive proliferation of granulation tissue in healing wounds.

granulation

(grăn′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of granulating.
b. The condition or appearance of being granulated.
2.
a. Small, fleshy, beadlike protuberances, consisting of outgrowths of new capillaries, on the surface of a wound that is healing. Also called granulation tissue.
b. The formation of these protuberances.
3. The small, transient, brilliant granular markings on the photosphere of the sun.

gran·u·la·tion

(gran'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Formation into grains or granules; the state of being granular.
2. A granular mass in or on the surface of any organ or membrane or one of the individual granules forming the mass.
3. The formation of minute, rounded, fleshy connective tissue projections on the surface of a wound, ulcer, or inflamed tissue surface during healing; one of the fleshy granules composing this surface.
See also: granulation tissue
4. pharmacology The formation of crystals by constant agitation of a supersaturated solution of a salt.
Synonym(s): granulatio.
[L. granulatio]

gran·u·la·tion

(gran'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Formation into grains or granules; state of being granular.
2. Granular mass in or on surface of any organ or membrane; one of the individual granules that form the mass.
3. Formation of minute, rounded, fleshy connective tissue projections on wound surface, ulcer, or inflamed tissue in process of healing; one of the fleshy granules composing this surface.
4. In pharmacy, formation of crystals by constant agitation of a supersaturated solution of a salt; product used in the manufacture of tablets for oral use.
[L. granulatio]

granulation

1. the division of a hard substance into small particles.
2. the formation in wounds of small, rounded masses of tissue during healing; also the mass so formed.

arachnoid g's
enlarged arachnoid villi projecting into the venous sinuses and creating slight depressions on the inner surface of the cranium.
exuberant g's
excessive proliferation of granulation tissue in the healing of a wound.
granulation tissue
the new tissue formed in repair of wounds of soft tissue, consisting of connective tissue cells and ingrowing young vessels. It ultimately forms the cicatrix; excessive granulation is a common cause of chronic failure of wounds on the lower limbs of horses to heal.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] One important factor in the pathogenesis of granulation tissue-type hemangiomas may be the excessive production of local tumor angiogenesis factors as a result of minor trauma or underlying cutaneous disease.
The historical treatment approaches to post-tracheostomy granulation tissue include topical steroid creams, antibiotic preparations, silver nitrate, and/or inhaled beclomethasone.
The granulation tissue was surgically excised and removed and tissue sample sent for histopathology revealed the mass to be granulation tissue.
Granulation is seen as a way of constructing simple theories out of more complex ones [1].
RESULTS: Improvement of the wound in the form of reducing the diameter and depth and increasing proliferation of granulation tissue was significant in VAC group.
Sometimes, it is difficult to ascertain the effects of different process variables on granule properties during technology transfer of a fluid bed granulation process from the pilot to commercial stages.
Not only will the granulation of these waste materials into fertilizer grade products help ease the pressure on businesses in need of carbon credits, but it will also aid in boosting Australia's agriculture industry.
Ingrown toenails could be a cause of granulation tissue of the lateral nail fold of the finger or toe (1).
In the mid-1860s, considerable controversy erupted between James Nasmyth [22] and the Reverend William Rutter Dawes [23] over the appearance of the solar granulation [13].
Huber Corporation, has received approval for its Health & Nutrition business to begin producing active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), such as calcium carbonate granulation for use in the manufacturing of antacids and other pharma applications.
2 from Glasgow, Scotland, reported laryngeal and ocular granulation tissue formation in two children of Punjabi descent who had similar features affecting their skin, nails and teeth.
Dry granulation technology represents an important option for clients faced with development challenges resulting from moisture sensitive active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs).