grandiose


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grandiose

 [gran´de-ōs″]
in psychiatry, pertaining to exaggerated belief or claims of one's importance or identity, often manifested by delusions of great wealth, power, or fame.

gran·di·ose

(gran'dē-ōs),
Pertaining to feelings of great importance, expansiveness, or delusions of grandeur.
[It. grandioso, fr. L. grandis, large]

grandiose

/gran·di·ose/ (gran´de-ōs″) in psychiatry, pertaining to exaggerated belief or claims of one's importance or identity, often manifested by delusions of great wealth, power, or fame.

grandiose

[gran′dē·ōs′]
Etymology: L, grandis, great
1 pertaining to something or somebody imposing, impressive, magnificent; pompous and showy.
2 pertaining to behavior or beliefs seen in a mania.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analysis also found that grandiose narcissism in U.
The results from this study are consistent with previous research that has shown religiosity to be the most common theme in grandiose delusions.
Geller and Luby (1997) found that approximately 22 percent of children and 18 percent of adolescents with bipolar disorder demonstrated features of CD, such as poor judgment and grandiose behaviors, as initial manifestations of early-onset bipolar disorder.
LIVE Aid founder Bob Geldof has condemned Tony Blair's 'guff, grandiose schemes' to tackle world poverty.
LIVE Aid founder Bob Geldof yesterday condemned Tony Blair's "guff and grandiose schemes" to tackle world poverty.
What's truly remarkable about the anti-NCLB rebellion is this: In both conservative Utah and liberal Vermont, state legislatures are gagging on a grandiose social engineering program devised by a "conservative" Republican president, and passed by a "conservative" Republican-led Congress.
Each of the authors writes out of a conviction of the importance for social work of the theory and research reviewed and developed by Braithwaite, but there is also caution about the infancy of research in this field and the need to avoid grandiose claims.
Under Cosimo III, the art of the still-life moved from Garzoni's intimate scale to the grandiose, and from the scientific to the horticultural and culinary.
Citizens must surely be fed up with having their town ripped to bits with grandiose schemes.
Grandiose visions beget grandiose actions, which often end tragically.
The severe psychiatric ailment known as bipolar disorder takes individuals on an emotional roller-coaster ride over dizzying peaks of agitation, euphoria, and grandiose thinking and through valleys of soul-numbing depression.
Morris uses a more recent, less grandiose arrangement of the music, commissioned for the Boston Pops.