grandiose


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grandiose

 [gran´de-ōs″]
in psychiatry, pertaining to exaggerated belief or claims of one's importance or identity, often manifested by delusions of great wealth, power, or fame.

gran·di·ose

(gran'dē-ōs),
Pertaining to feelings of great importance, expansiveness, or delusions of grandeur.
[It. grandioso, fr. L. grandis, large]

grandiose

/gran·di·ose/ (gran´de-ōs″) in psychiatry, pertaining to exaggerated belief or claims of one's importance or identity, often manifested by delusions of great wealth, power, or fame.

grandiose

[gran′dē·ōs′]
Etymology: L, grandis, great
1 pertaining to something or somebody imposing, impressive, magnificent; pompous and showy.
2 pertaining to behavior or beliefs seen in a mania.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vulnerable narcissism, as described in the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual and in various theoretical and empirical studies as separate from grandiose narcissism (PDM Task Force, 2006), has been linked to special abilities in relatedness and empathy (McWilliams, 2011).
The post OUR VIEW: Less grandiose plans, more practical steps needed from tripartite appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
The analysis also found that grandiose narcissism in U.
The results from this study are consistent with previous research that has shown religiosity to be the most common theme in grandiose delusions.
Customers can so easily take their supplier for granted, leaving them vulnerable to a competitor who sweeps in with grandiose promises.
Picasso did something similar in his portrait of Gertrude Stein, and Chuck Close does it in his grandiose self-portraits.
We can't win a grandiose war on poverty, but after a tragedy comes opportunity.
Impending mania also may appear as an increase in behaviors such as being silly, giddy, goofy, or mouthy, having grandiose ideas (e.
Consider how they're whiling away their majority in what senators love to insist is the "world's greatest deliberative body"--a sobriquet every bit as self-styled, grandiose, and unconvincing as Michael Jackson calling himself "the King of Pop" and Miller High Life dubbing itself "the Champagne of Beers.
The name was a bit grandiose considering that it only consisted of four or five Web site links.
The name is a bit grandiose given that the car is essentially three bicycle tires, a lightweight shell and an electric motor, but it is driven by only two AA batteries.