grand mal


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Related to grand mal: petit mal

mal

 [mal] (Fr. and Sp.)
mal de Meleda symmetrical keratosis of the palms and soles associated with a dry, scaly thickening of the wrists and ankles.
mal de mer seasickness.

gen·er·al·ized ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

a generalized seizure characterized by the sudden onset of tonic contraction of the muscles often associated with a cry or moan, and frequently resulting in a fall to the ground. The tonic phase of the seizure gradually give way to clonic convulsive movements occurring bilaterally and synchronously before slowing and eventually stopping, followed by a variable period of unconsciousness and gradual recovery.

grand mal

(grahn mal) [Fr.] see under epilepsy.

gen·er·al·ized ton·ic-clo·nic sei·zure

, generalized tonic-clonic epilepsy (jen'ĕr-ă-līzd ton'ik-klon'ik sē'zhŭr, ep'i-lep'sē)
A generalized seizure characterized by the sudden onset of tonic contraction of the muscles often associated with a cry or moan, and frequently resulting in a fall to the ground. The tonic phase of the seizure gradually gives way to clonic convulsive movements occurring bilaterally and synchronously before slowing and eventually stopping, followed by a variable period of unconsciousness and gradual recovery.
Synonym(s): grand mal.

grand mal

A major epileptic seizure. The fit may include a prodromal stage, an AURA, a tonic stage with sudden contraction of all muscles, a clonic stage in which the muscles undergo a succession of convulsive jerky contractions, and a period of unconsciousness or sleep.

epilepsy

chronic neurological disorder characterized by variable episodes of paroxysmal brain dysfunction (i.e. a fit), altered levels of consciousness and excessive neuronal discharge and/or convulsions followed by a period of sleepiness; fits are controlled by antiepileptic drugs, e.g. carbamazepine (Tegretol), gabapentin (Neurontin), phenytoin (Epanutin), pregabalin (Lyrica), sodium valproate (Epilim); local anaesthetic drugs within the systemic circulation agonize antiepileptic medications
  • focal epilepsy; cortical epilepsy seizure often preceded by a specific sensory phenomenon (aura), and characterized by isolated disturbance of cerebral function, e.g. uncontrollable twitching of one limb, and followed by some degree of subsequent temporary mental dysfunction

  • generalized epilepsy; grand mal epilepsy a classic epileptic seizure often preceded by a brief, specific sensory phenomenon (aura), and characterized by a sudden loss of consciousness, cyanosis and tonic muscular spasm (lasting approximately 30 seconds), followed by repetitive clonic body jerking, (lasting for a few minutes), with frothing at the mouth and urinary incontinence after which the patient remains unconscious or semiconscious and flaccid for several minutes; the patient may remain drowsy or confused for some time after the seizure has passed

  • petit mal epilepsy characterized by short period of 'absence', during which the patient does not become unconscious or suffer muscular spasms but is temporarily non-reactive to and unaware of his or her surroundings or actions

  • temporal-lobe epilepsy; psychomotor epilepsy attacks characterized by impaired consciousness and amnesia, clonic limb movements, hallucinations or other psychic disturbances

  • tonic epilepsy seizure characterized by tonic convulsions and rigidity

grand mal

[Fr.] a major seizure attended by loss of consciousness and convulsive movements, as distinguished from petit mal, a minor seizure. See also epilepsy, seizure.
References in periodicals archive ?
You wouldn't have thought it was the same lad having a major grand mal fit one week and saying 'come on dad, hurry up' the next.
My wife of 39 years suffered two grand mal seizures in 2000.
the quaking overtakes her, and the grand mal of a new poem begins.
A person having a grand mal or tonic-clonic seizure will often fall to the ground and the muscles will contract violently, resulting in a "fit".
The study also refers to 11 reports of neonatal convulsions and two grand mal seizures, with no further description of the cases (Lancet 2005;365:482-7).
Other signs may include; facial pallor, sweating, bradycardia, palpitations, depression, apprehension, hiccups, weakness, amnesia, headache, vertigo and eventually the least desirable of these effects, grand mal seizure.
The study also refers to 11 reports of neonatal convulsions and 2 reports of grand mal seizures, with no further description of the cases (Lancet 2005;365:482-7).
We report a case that was all the more extraordinary because of the age and sex of the patient (an 11-year-old boy), the unusual associated symptoms (epistaxis and grand mal seizures), and the presence of intracranial extension.
These words were written on the medical records only a few hours after my wife had been admitted to the hospital having had four grand mal seizures within 48 hours.
He experiences both petit mal and grand mal seizures: the worst of these leave him unconscious, writhing, vomiting and hitting his head: they constitute a medical emergency requiring immediate care.
A 49-year-old African-American woman with a history of grand mal epileptic seizures, hypertension, status post cerebrovascular accident (CVA), congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus came to our hospital for MR procedures.