morpheme

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mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in classic literature ?
After that we got on better, and now I read my lessons pretty well, for this way of studying suits me, and I can see that the grammar gets tucked into the tales and poetry as one gives pills in jelly.
1 English Grammar (1795), by Lindley Murray (1745-1826), the most authoritative American grammarian of his day.
She read with Dick Carter and Living Perkins, who were fitting for the academy; recited arithmetic with lisping little Thuthan Thimpthon; geography with Emma Jane Perkins, and grammar after school hours to Miss Dearborn alone.
The one with red cheeks is called Miss Smith; she attends to the work, and cuts out--for we make our own clothes, our frocks, and pelisses, and everything; the little one with black hair is Miss Scatcherd; she teaches history and grammar, and hears the second class repetitions; and the one who wears a shawl, and has a pocket- handkerchief tied to her side with a yellow ribband, is Madame Pierrot: she comes from Lisle, in France, and teaches French.
Those are not governors of islands," observed Samson, "but of other governments of an easier kind: those that govern islands must at least know grammar.
Naseby is of course a large proprietor in our neighbourhood; but fidelity to facts, decent feeling, and English grammar, are all of them qualities more important than the possession of land.
True, I know the grammar and the words, but yet I know not how to speak them.
Eliot, at the close of his Indian Grammar, mentions him as "a pregnant-witted young man, who had been a servant in an English house, who pretty well understood his own language, and had a clear pronunciation.
Then came Eulalie, the proud beauty, the Juno of the school, whom six long years of drilling in the simple grammar of the English language had compelled, despite the stiff phlegm of her intellect, to acquire a mechanical acquaintance with most of its rules.
Soon after this comfortable declaration from his school master, the lad was removed to the house of the village doctor, a gentleman whose early career had not been unlike that of our hero where he was to be seen sometimes watering a horse, at others watering medicines, blue, yellow, and red: then again he might be noticed lolling under an apple-tree, with Ruddiman’s Latin Grammar in his hand, and a corner of Denman’s Midwifery sticking out of a pocket; for his instructor held it absurd to teach his pupil how to dispatch a patient regularly from this world, before he knew how to bring him into it.
You always speak the best French in the world; you shall give me a lesson in grammar and correct language, whilst I wait the return of your master.
I have been thinking some of taking a teacher, but I am well acquainted with the grammar already, and teachers always keep you bothering over the verbs.