grain


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grain

 [grān]
1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant.
2. the smallest unit in the apothecaries' and avoirdupois systems, equal to 0.065 of a gram; abbreviated gr.

grain

(grān),
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, for example, sand.
3. A unit of weight equivalent to 0.064799 grain [For other equivalents, see appendix, Weights and Measures].
4. A macroscopically visible cluster of organisms living in tissue of patients with actinomycosis or mycetoma.
5. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr)

Etymology: L, granum, seed
the smallest unit of mass in avoirdupois, troy, and apothecaries' weights formerly based on the weight of a plump grain of wheat. The grain is the same and is equal to 65 mg. The troy and apothecaries' ounces contain 480 grains; the avoirdupois ounce contains 437.5 grains.

grain

(1) An obsolete, non-SI (International System) unit of weight formerly used by pharmacists, equal to 0.0648 g. 
(2) A nonspecific term for any granule particle (e.g., a psammoma body), seen by light microscopy; the term is no longer used in pathology.
(3) A cereal plant—e.g., barley, oat, wheat—or seed thereof.

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. Cereal plants (e.g., corn, wheat, or rye), or a seed of one of them.
2. A minute, hard particle of any substance, as of sand.
3. A unit of weight, 1/60 dram (apoth. or troy), 1/437.5 avoirdupois ounce, 1/480 troy ounce, 1/5760 troy pound, 1/7000 avoirdupois pound; the equivalent of 0.064799 gram.
[L. granum]

grain

(gr) (grān)
1. One of the cereal plants, or its seed.
2. A hard, minute particle of any substance, e.g., sand.
3. The grain is obsolete as a unit in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, and nursing. Avoid abbreviationgr, which is subject to frequent misinterpretation. A unit of weight equivalent to 64.79 mg.
4. A particle of a silver halide in a photographic emulsion.
[L. granum]

grain (gr),

n 1. a unit of weight equal to 0.0648 g.
n 2. a crystal of an alloy.
grain boundary,
n the junction of two grains growing from different nuclei, impinging and causing discontinuity of the lattice structure. Important in corrosion and brittleness of metals.
grain growth,

grain

1. a seed, especially of a cereal plant; for best results in feeding the seed may be rolled, cracked, flaked (below).
2. the twentieth part of a scruple: 0.065 g; abbreviated gr. See also Table 4.2.
3. the texture and patterned appearance of the outside of leather.
4. the size and nature of the crystals of the fluorescent salt used in intensifying screens and also the size and nature of silver halide crystals used in photographic emulsion.

grain engorgement
flaked grain
grain that has been cooked and then rolled flat. The digestibility is greatly enhanced but the process is costly.
grain fumigants
substances used to fumigate silos full of grain to kill insect pests. Use of these agents other than as recommended by the makers may lead to poisoning. See also methyl bromide.
high-moisture grain
see moist grain storage.
grain itch mites
micronized grain
heated in a dry heat then rolled.
grain overload
popped grain
grain passed across a heated plate and popped like popcorn.
grain rash
grain itch mite dermatitis.
roasted grain
roasted in dry heat but not popped.
grain screenings
debris from a grain batch that is removed by passing it over a screen. Has some feeding value but this varies with the mix of contents.
grain sorghum
Sorghum bicolor (S. vulgare).
spent grain
grain used in brewing or liquor production that has been exhausted of its carbohydrate; includes brewer's grains, distiller's grains.
sprouted grain

Patient discussion about grain

Q. What and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain… I am 21 years old and would like to know that in order to get the required fiber per day what and how much intake should I have 1. Vegetables, 2. Fruits and whole grain…

A. actually men under 50 should have 38 grams a day of fiber. here is a nice article about fiber consuming and a list of foods that contain fiber and the amount of it:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/fiber/NU00033/METHOD=print

More discussions about grain
References in classic literature ?
At this second interchange of the Christian name, Madame Defarge, still using her toothpick with profound composure, coughed another grain of cough, and raised her eyebrows by the breadth of another line.
It was quite clear that no woman could live upon two or three bread-crumbs and a few grains of rice, and I determined to find out how and when she got food.
But the Prince was so deeply grieved, and apologised so very humbly, that after some time the heart of the good little Frog was softened, and she gave him another tiny little grain, but instead of being sand it was now a grain of gold.
To this the duchess said, "Sancho, my friend, mind what you are saying; it seems you could not have seen the earth, but only the men walking on it; for if the earth looked to you like a grain of mustard seed, and each man like a hazel nut, one man alone would have covered the whole earth.
And they flew down into the ashes; and the little doves put their heads down and set to work, pick, pick, pick; and then the others began pick, pick, pick; and they put all the good grain into the dishes, and left all the ashes.
And then the railroads and market-riggers and the rest proceed to rob him of that same grain,"--Daylight broke in Dede smiled and
A heavy footstep announced the approach of the grain lender.
In these days of fatted cattle and waving grain-fields this humble root, which was once the totem of an Indian tribe, is quite forgotten, or known only by its flowering vine; but let wild Nature reign here once more, and the tender and luxurious English grains will probably disappear before a myriad of foes, and without the care of man the crow may carry back even the last seed of corn to the great cornfield of the Indian's God in the southwest, whence he is said to have brought it; but the now almost exterminated ground-nut will perhaps revive and flourish in spite of frosts and wildness, prove itself indigenous, and resume its ancient importance and dignity as the diet of the hunter tribe.
And now it worked much more evil than before; for some of these pieces were hardly so large as a grain of sand, and they flew about in the wide world, and when they got into people's eyes, there they stayed; and then people saw everything perverted, or only had an eye for that which was evil.
Changeable is she, and wayward; often have I seen her bite her lip, and pass the comb against the grain of her hair.
In those cynical words there was indeed a grain of truth.
And now there is the thunder of the huge covered wagon coming home with sacks of grain.