graft survival


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Related to graft survival: graft survival rate

graft survival

Persistent functioning of a transplanted organ or tissue in a recipient of that organ. Survival rates of transplanted organs are influenced by many factors, including the age and health status of both the donor and the recipient of the graft, the immunological match between the donor and the recipient, the preparation of the organ before transplantation, and the use of immunosuppressive drugs. For some organ transplantation, graft survival approximates 90%.
See also: survival
References in periodicals archive ?
Does nephrectomy of failed allograft influence graft survival after re-transplantation.
Graft survival after liver transplantation also tends to improve when comparing data from transplants performed from 1984 to 1991 with those performed from 1992 to 2001, with an 8.
The graft survival rates for the same time intervals were 80%, 77%, and 68%, respectively.
Risk factor for delayed graft function in cadaveric kidney transplantation: a prospective study of renal function and graft survival after preservation with University of Wisconsin solution in multi-organ-donors.
over a ten year period, each 1 % improvement in graft survival reduces the number of European patients who require dialysis by 1,910
Patients were evaluated for MR dosing and trough levels, laboratory values, concomitant medications, graft survival and adverse events.
Some studies have suggested that LDLTs in patients with HCV result in poorer graft survival than those in patients without HCV.
Adverse events, skin graft survival and formation of anti-RECOTHROM antibodies were measured at baseline and Day 29 after application of RECOTHROM.
Leading hair restoration surgeons around the world have adopted HypoThermosol after seeing improved graft survival and increased patient satisfaction.
After three years, graft survival was 72 percent for transplant recipients whose donor livers had no steatosis, 58 percent for mild, 43 percent for moderate and 42 percent for severe, Medical News Today reported.
The study found that patient and graft survival, acute rejection rates and incidence of new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), were similar in Neoral and Prograf patients.
But patient and graft survival rates were similar in both small and large OPOs 1 year after transplantation, according to data from January 2000 through June 2002.