gorget


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

gor·get

(gōr'jet),
A director or guide with wide groove for use in lithotomy.

gorget

(gôr′jĭt)
n.
A surgical director or guide with a wide groove for use in lithotomy.

gor·get

(gōr'jet)
A director or guide with wide groove for use in lithotomy.

gorget

(gor′jĕt) [Fr. gorge, throat, because of shape of instrument]
An instrument grooved to protect soft tissues from injury as a pointed instrument is inserted in a body cavity.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Social Justice Secretary Alex Neil announced details of the Broomhill investment on a visit to Cubes Gorget district heating scheme which is already benefitting residents in the area.
Two gilded military instruments, a shield and a gilded gorget, rest adjacent to the furniture.
There are over 3,500 items on show, ranging from the Shannongrove Gorget, a Celtic gold breast ornament of 700 BC, to Peter Chang's acrylic and polyester brooch (1992).
His ruby-red gorget flared, as he swooped down and swiped at the Senator's necktie.
CHARLIE BLAIN, from Frodsham, called to report an unseasonal male ring ouzel near his home - Charlie got good views of the bird, noting its white gorget and pale edged wings.
With: Edith Merieau, Vincent Dubois, Jeanne Ferron, Philippe Fauconnier, Celine Gorget, Vincent Rocher, France Ducateau, Cyril Couton, Charlotte Smither, Karim Hammiche, Veronique Dossetto, Dominique Coquelin.
In 1831, Major Thomas Mitchell rewarded Piper, his Aboriginal guide, for services rendered by presenting him with an officer's uniform and a brass gorget (see J.
A long, deeply forked tail and elongated violet or magenta gorget (throat area) make the Lucifer unmistakable among North American hummingbirds.
Neither can he be seen wearing it on the stylish white tunic of the uniform he designed for himself as Administrator, very much in the colonial viceroy style complete with bullion cord epaulettes and bullion on velvet gorget patches worn on the stand-up collars.
She pinned the earrings and gorget on two small black satin cushions and placed them in the display window.
Portraits from the late sixteenth century forward cite metonymic pieces of armor as part of fashionable dress--a gorget here, a sword belt there, nonsensical as protection but vital as "power dressing.