gonadoblastoma


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go·nad·o·blas·to·ma

(gō-nad'ō-blas-tō'ma), [MIM*424500]
Benign neoplasm composed of germ cells, sex cord derivatives, stromal cells; appears in cases of mixed or pure gonadal dysgenesis; usually small (1-3 cm) and partially calcified, but may give rise to malignant germ-cell tumors, most often seminoma/dysgerminoma or embryonal.

gonadoblastoma

[gō′nədōblastō′mə]
Etymology: Gk, gone, seed + blastos, germ + -oma, tumor
a rare benign type of germ cell tumor, usually occurring in patients with gonadal dysgenesis, and often bilateral. It contains all gonadal elements and is frequently associated with an abnormal chromosomal karyotype. It may give rise to a dysgerminoma or other more malignant germ cell tumor. See also dysgerminoma, gonadal dysgenesis.

gonadoblastoma

Gynecology Dysgenetic gonadoma A mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumor which is most commonly seen in sexually abnormal persons, especially with gonadal dysgenesis–GD with a Y chromosome–ie, XY GD and XO-XY mosaicism; gonadoblastomas carry a 25% risk of neoplasia. See Sex-cord tumor Urology A mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumor which almost invariably arises in a background of a gonadal disorder, either pure or mixed gonadal dysgenesis, male pseudohermaphroditism or, less commonly, in a phenotypically or karyotypically normal male. See Sex cord-stromal tumor.

go·nad·o·blas·to·ma

(gō-nad'ō-blas-tō'ma)
Rare, benign neoplasm composed of germ cells, sex cord derivatives, and stromal cells; appears in cases of mixed or pure gonadal dysgenesis; usually small (1-3 cm) and partially calcified but may give rise to malignant germ-cell tumors, most often seminoma and dysgerminoma or embryonal; usually bilateral; found in patients with gonadal dysgenesis.

gonadoblastoma

a rare, primary tumor of testicle or ovary containing, besides interstitial cells, germ cells, epithelial cells and granulosa cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of malignant germ cell tumor overgrowth can be established in most cases by conventional hematoxylin-eosin sections, but immunohistochemical stain for inhibin can be useful in certain situations to demonstrate the sex cord elements that are present in gonadoblastoma but not in de novo malignant germ cell tumors (Figure 6, A and B).
In the setting of gonadal dysgenesis, prophylactic gonadectomy specimens should be assessed for the presence of both gonadoblastoma and malignant germ cell-tumor elements.
Obtaining 3 to 6 step sections of 200 [Am from each paraffin block significantly increases the detection rate of microscopic foci of gonadoblastoma.
Calcification and hyalinization can ultimately lead to changes referred to as "burnt-out" gonadoblastoma in which tumor cells can be sparse or even completely absent, and the pattern of calcification or the presence of Leydig-like cells may be the only evidence of a gonadoblastoma.
Gonadoblastoma should also be distinguished from the unclassified germ cell sex cord-stromal tumors, which lack the distinctive features of a gonadoblastoma.
In these cases, the presence of a burnt-out gonadoblastoma is an important indicator for the origin of the tumor.
The macroscopic appearance of gonadoblastoma varies depending on size, amount of calcification, and presence or absence of a malignant germ cell-tumor component.
Gonadoblastoma is part of the mixed germ cell sex cord-stromal tumor group.