goldenseal


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goldenseal

/gol·den·seal/ (gōl´den-sēl″) the North American herb Hydrastis canadensis, or its dried rhizome, a preparation of which is used in folk medicine and in homeopathy.

goldenseal

(gōl′dən-sēl′)
n.
A North American woodland plant (Hydrastis canadensis) in the buttercup family, having small greenish-white flowers and a yellow root used in herbal medicine.

goldenseal

a perennial herb found in the Ohio River valley.
uses It is used for high blood pressure, poor appetite, infections, menstrual problems, minor sciatic pain, and muscle spasms. It is also used as an eye wash and by some hoping to hide the presence of marijuana, cocaine, or other illicit drugs in the urine. Goldenseal is ineffective at masking illicit drugs in urine tests. There is insufficient reliable information to gauge its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It is probably not safe when used at high doses or long term. The active constituent berberine can cause significant toxicity. Goldenseal is contraindicated in women who are pregnant (it is a uterine stimulant) or breastfeeding, and it should not be used in infants. It also should not be used in people with known hypersensitivity to this herb or with cardiovascular conditions such as heart block, arrhythmias, or hypertension. It should not be used locally for purulent ear discharge or in a ruptured ear drum.
A perennial herb that contains alkaloids—e.g., berberine and canadine, resin, and volatile oil, regarded by Native American medicine men as antimicrobial, antituberculotic, antiseptic, haemostatic, and a liver tonic
Toxicity It should not be used in pregnancy, as it may stimulate uterine contractions
Contraindications Diabetes, glaucoma, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, prior stroke

gol·den·seal

(gōld'ĕn sēl)
(Hydrastis canadensis) Herbal remedy that claims unsubstantiated benefit in treatment of anorexia nervosa, cancer, gastrointestinal disease, pruritus, and other conditions. Widely reported adverse effects (e.g., seizures, cardiac problems, respiratory depression). Death has been reported after overdose. Among the most commonly used of all herbal preparations.
Synonym(s): eye balm, yellow paint, yellow puccoon.

goldenseal,

n Latin name:
Hydrastis canadensis; part used: rhizomes (dried); uses: antimicrobial, expec-torant, antiinflammatory, gastritis, digestive and oral ulcers, bladder infections, sore throat, epidermal infections, cancer, tuberculosis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with heart conditions or ruptured eardrums; not recommended for more than 6 weeks at one time, can cause bradycardia, asystole, an-xiety, convulsions, nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, and paralysis (elevated doses). Also called
eye balm, eye root, goldsiegel, ground raspberry, Indian dye, Indian paint, Indian turmeric, jaundice root, orange root, turmeric root, yellow paint, yellow puccoon, yellow root, warnera, and
wild curcuma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harvest recovery of goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis L.
In fact, many wild plant organizations like the National Center for the Preservation of Medicinal Herbs in Rutland, Ohio, encourage the cultivation of plants like goldenseal under natural conditions in their natural environment.
The Goldenseal kitchen estimates include unit prices for demolition, framing, wallboard, cabinets, tile, flooring, plumbing, appliances, and other kitchen remodeling items.
Encouraged by this successful marking program, resource managers at Blue Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah, Mammoth Cave, Cumberland Gap, and several Canadian provincial parks are attaching similar signature markers to ginseng and other high-dollar poaching targets such as goldenseal, black cohosh, blue cohosh, bloodroot, lady's slipper orchids, lilies, trillium, and galax.
Coral White combines hydrogen peroxide for its gentle whitening effect; the essence of tea tree, spearmint, and peppermint oils for their flavorful freshness; and the antiseptic, antimicrobial, and antioxidant botanicals echinacea, goldenseal, cinnamon, clove, ginseng, and gingko.
May Raise Blood Pressure Capsicum Goldenseal Licorice
United Plant Savers, a nonprofit educational organization, has put many popular species such as American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa), echinacea (Echinacea ssp) and goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) on its list of critically threatened medicinal plants.
Saxena and Murch are finishing a study on the endangered goldenseal, a popular North American medicinal herb.
Berberine, the active ingredient in Goldenseal, Barberry, and Oregon grape may possibly reduce the effectiveness of tetracycline, according to one study, but not another.
The Natural Dentist toothpaste and mouth rinse contain echinacea, goldenseal, calendula, bloodroot and aloe.
Goldenseal has become increasingly rare throughout its range, and was listed on the Convention for international Trade on Endangered Species (CITES) in 1997, but it is not clear to what extent this is due to overharvesting versus habitat loss or degradation, in Ohio, the core of its range, there is minimal information on the status of goldenseal, but populations are believed to be declining.
MigraSpray[TM], a newly patented homeopathic sublingual liquid which contains feverfew, dandelion, goldenseal and polyporus, has clinically demonstrated to provide significant improvement in 88 percent of individuals--66 percent of whom experienced complete relief of symptoms in less than seven minutes.