goldenseal


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goldenseal

/gol·den·seal/ (gōl´den-sēl″) the North American herb Hydrastis canadensis, or its dried rhizome, a preparation of which is used in folk medicine and in homeopathy.

goldenseal

(gōl′dən-sēl′)
n.
A North American woodland plant (Hydrastis canadensis) in the buttercup family, having small greenish-white flowers and a yellow root used in herbal medicine.

goldenseal

a perennial herb found in the Ohio River valley.
uses It is used for high blood pressure, poor appetite, infections, menstrual problems, minor sciatic pain, and muscle spasms. It is also used as an eye wash and by some hoping to hide the presence of marijuana, cocaine, or other illicit drugs in the urine. Goldenseal is ineffective at masking illicit drugs in urine tests. There is insufficient reliable information to gauge its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It is probably not safe when used at high doses or long term. The active constituent berberine can cause significant toxicity. Goldenseal is contraindicated in women who are pregnant (it is a uterine stimulant) or breastfeeding, and it should not be used in infants. It also should not be used in people with known hypersensitivity to this herb or with cardiovascular conditions such as heart block, arrhythmias, or hypertension. It should not be used locally for purulent ear discharge or in a ruptured ear drum.
A perennial herb that contains alkaloids—e.g., berberine and canadine, resin, and volatile oil, regarded by Native American medicine men as antimicrobial, antituberculotic, antiseptic, haemostatic, and a liver tonic
Toxicity It should not be used in pregnancy, as it may stimulate uterine contractions
Contraindications Diabetes, glaucoma, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, prior stroke

gol·den·seal

(gōld'ĕn sēl)
(Hydrastis canadensis) Herbal remedy that claims unsubstantiated benefit in treatment of anorexia nervosa, cancer, gastrointestinal disease, pruritus, and other conditions. Widely reported adverse effects (e.g., seizures, cardiac problems, respiratory depression). Death has been reported after overdose. Among the most commonly used of all herbal preparations.
Synonym(s): eye balm, yellow paint, yellow puccoon.

goldenseal,

n Latin name:
Hydrastis canadensis; part used: rhizomes (dried); uses: antimicrobial, expec-torant, antiinflammatory, gastritis, digestive and oral ulcers, bladder infections, sore throat, epidermal infections, cancer, tuberculosis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with heart conditions or ruptured eardrums; not recommended for more than 6 weeks at one time, can cause bradycardia, asystole, an-xiety, convulsions, nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, and paralysis (elevated doses). Also called
eye balm, eye root, goldsiegel, ground raspberry, Indian dye, Indian paint, Indian turmeric, jaundice root, orange root, turmeric root, yellow paint, yellow puccoon, yellow root, warnera, and
wild curcuma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Encouraged by this successful marking program, resource managers at Blue Ridge Parkway, Shenandoah, Mammoth Cave, Cumberland Gap, and several Canadian provincial parks are attaching similar signature markers to ginseng and other high-dollar poaching targets such as goldenseal, black cohosh, blue cohosh, bloodroot, lady's slipper orchids, lilies, trillium, and galax.
The issue of sustainability is a central concern and we're studying the use of plants such as goldenseal and black cohosh," says Michael McGuffin, president of the American Herbal Products Association and Chairman of the Industry Committee of the MPWG.
The informal, reminiscing quality in most of the articles is due in part to thc influence of former Goldenseal editor Ken Sullivan, who encouraged writers to tell the broader cultural story.
FDA does not have information about the safety or purported benefits of the following substances, which consumers frequently have questions about: blue-green algae, chromium picolinate, colloidal minerals, pycnogenol, creatine, HMB (beta-hydroxymethylbutyrate), cat's claw, echinacea, goldenseal and pyruvate.
Written by leading researchers contributing to the field, this is the first reference to provide in-depth coverage of garlic, ginseng, Echinacea, ginger, fenugreek, St John's Wort, Ginko Bibloba, goldenseal, saw palmetto, valerian, evening primrose, licorice, bilberries, blueberries and black and green teas.
If so, state why: "Warning: Both echinacea and goldenseal are considered relatively safe, however echinacea may be contraindicated (in certain cases).
In addition, smart drug users have all kinds of ways of foiling the test, from the herb goldenseal (available in health food stores) to vials of drug-free, battery-warmed urine (available on the Web).
There are 12 million acres of privately owned forestland just in Virginia, and much of it could grow ginseng as well as goldenseal, which likes a similar habitat.
This unspoken, though strongly suggested, "transplant that did not take" finds yet another signification in the goldenseal plant which Canewell presents to Vera once he learns that she is contemplating a move further north to Chicago with Floyd.
This is the problem Federal and State agencies face in trying to maintain the viability of wild goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis).
Once the foliage fades, fall harvest includes chicory, goldenseal or burdock along with nuts, seeds and roots.
Consider systemic: garlic, Oregon grape, goldenseal, vaginal L.