goitrogenic


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goitrogenic

 [goi-tro-jen´ik]
producing goiter.

goi·tro·gen·ic

(goy'trō-jen'ik),
Causing goiter.

goi·tro·gen·ic

(goy'trō-jen'ik)
Causing goiter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Goitrogenic foods like cassava are not cultivated in the areas, but staples such as millet are common.
These data show association between several goitrogenic anions found in the environment and a measure of thyroid function in children recruited from general pediatric clinics.
Moreover, although there is still a need for further analysis regarding the interaction of micronutrient deficiencies and the effect of goitrogenic compounds on iodine status in these communities, it is apparent that consumption of iodized salt will be of great benefit in improving IDD in the study population.
This could be explained by improved iodine status in our population inhibiting the goitrogenic effect of smoking, as was observed in a previous study (32).
17) Cabbage and related vegetables contain glucosinolates, which have goitrogenic activity.
The isoflavone glucosides genistein, and glycitein-O-P-glucoside are the major soybean goitrogenic compounds.
Thus an attempt was made to find out the involvement of goitrogenic factors other than iodine deficiency for the persistence of this disorder.
Several other inorganic anions such as thiocyanate and nitrate that are present in dietary and environmental sources have goitrogenic effects (Greer et al.
Goitrogenic anions, thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid hormone in infants.
In rats subjected to cholinergic decentralization of the thyroid gland, a decrease of plasma T4 and an increase of plasma TSH, as well as an impaired goitrogenic and thyroid compensatory response, were detectable.
Soy isoflavones, touted by many as a benign substitute for endogenous estrogens for postmenopausal women, can be goitrogenic, although the amounts usually consumed by adults are insufficient to have that effect.