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bat

(bat),
A member of the mammalian order Chiroptera.
[M.E. bakke]

bat

(băt)
n.
Any of various nocturnal flying mammals of the order Chiroptera, having membranous wings that extend from the forelimbs to the hind limbs or tail and anatomical adaptations for echolocation, by which they navigate and hunt prey.

bat

A family of small flying mammals, order Chiroptera.
 
Bat pathogens
Duvenhage virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, Kasokero virus, Mokola virus, Lyssavirus, rabies, salmonellosis, Yuli virus.

BAT

Abbreviation for:
behavioural avoidance test
Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial
blood alcohol testing
blunt abdominal trauma
Breath Alcohol Technician
brown adipose tissue

Bivalirudin Angioplasty Trial  A trial comparing bivalirudin/Angiomax to heparin in patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for unstable angina.
 
Primary endpoint
In-hospital death, acute MI, target lesion revascularisation.
 
Conclusion
Post-PTCA for unstable angina, ASA and bivalirudin/Angiomax has fewer cardiac and haemorrhagic in-hospital events than ASA and heparin; post-PCI infusion of antithrombotics was used in both study groups.

Logistics
Randomised, double-blinded; 4315 patients—2151 heparin + aspirin, 2161 bivalirudin + aspirin.

BAT

Blunt abdominal trauma. See Blunt trauma.

BAT

Abbreviation for breath alcohol technician.

BAT

Abbrev for brown adipose tissue.

bat

a flying mammal of the order CHIROPTERA, the only true flying vertebrate apart from the birds.

bat


Australian bat lyssavirus disease
a disease identified in 1996 in Australian fruit-eating flying foxes (Pteropus spp.) in which it is presumed endemic and in which it may cause encephalitis; the virus, of the genus Lyssavirus and the family Rhabdoviridae, has also caused fatal rabies-like illness in persons working closely with infected bats.
bat rabies
caused by rabies-like viruses which are antigenically similar to the classical rabies rhabdovirus. Bats also are common carriers of rabies virus transmitting it to other species and between themselves both by bite and by aerosol inhalation of urine. See also lagos and mokola viruses.