God

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God

theophobia.
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The writers of the biblical texts projected God as one who had diversity within Godhood and also had dialogue within Godself among these diverse views and perspectives.
Above all, Mormons believe that following God's laws--even if these laws are contrary to the laws of civil society--will elevate a person into eventual godhood (p.
34) Ramsey took Rahner to detailed task in his own 1970 study, entitled Fabricated Man, in a section significantly entitled "Questionable Aspirations to Godhood.
The key to interpreting Leonardo becomes inclusiveness: Christ's "two-natured hand in its congruent godhood [instituting the Eucharist] and frailty [announcing betrayal] is the profoundest pun in all art.
All expression by Godhood is a product of this paradoxical unity and so, as passages in the epic confirm, lies beyond conceptions of dialectic, discourse, or conversation held by mortal beings or even by the inspired epic narrator.
Positive philosophy, which does not just remain within the realm of the conceivable and the possible, thus begins with the thought of sheer being and existence as such (and with the accompanying pure Vorstellung of such existence), and then shows how this sheer, necessary existence raises itself to Godhood as it freely and continuously creates nature and human history.
Apparently, some less sophisticated viewers are unable to digest (or read) its merger of Zen and Christianity -- Yoda and Obi-Wan Kenobi are Zen masters cum Trappist monks, and The Force is something like an eastern concept of a non-objective godhood that supports the films' samurai/gunfighter motifs very nicely.
But Kirilov's suicide, an act which is supposed to prove his perfect freedom and godhood, is interrupted by his mystical awakening, whereas Cross experiences no such epiphany.
There is, however, an apparent difficulty with attributing godhood to human rulers, namely, the fact that rulers are observed by their subjects to undergo the same processes as commoners do.
41); only to the presumer to godhood do the stories of the culture's gods ring an abrasive tune.
But that Father figure was also present (for believers) just off-screen in the opening Garden of Gethsemane scene, with Jesus praying to avoid the "chalice" of suffering that another part of His Godhood was demanding.