go private


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go private

To seek healthcare in the private sector—i.e., outside of the NHS. Going private means paying for healthcare services to which a patient is entitled for free under the NHS, but for which he/she may wait for months to receive. Thus, well-off patients forego free services to avoid frustration around scheduling and booking delays due to NHS backlogs for non-emergent care and services.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leuz, Triantis and Wang (LTW, 2008) look at firms that either deregister or go private before and after the passage of SOX.
11) Thus, we expect that the more financial resources a firm has, the more it is likely to go private.
But Warwick University spokeswoman Jenny Murray said: "It's unlikely that a university such as Warwick would go private.
The report added that acquisition "involving management was the most frequent form of seeking to go private, accounting for 67 percent of announced transactions.
Of those who would go private, 71pc cited higher standards as the main reason.
That was too long for anyone to wait so he decided he had to go private.
The alternative therefore is to go private, but those costs too are prohibitive.
Two Stockton MPs who attacked a dental practice which has switched to go private have received stinging criticism.
They are trying to keep the lid on a plan for Patient Passports under which the ill would be forced to go private and have half their costs met by the Government.
Historically low interest rates, and the resulting low cost of capital, will make debt service more manageable for companies that go private in the near future.
Tony James, vice chairman of the Blackstone Group, an investment banking firm, says he expects more firms to go private as the full impact of complying with Sarbanes-Oxley kicks in.