gnathostomiasis


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gnathostomiasis

 [nath″o-sto-mi´ah-sis]
infection with the nematode Gnathostoma spinigerum, acquired from eating undercooked fish infected with the larvae.

gnath·o·sto·mi·a·sis

(nath'ō-stō-mī'ă-sis),
A migrating edema, or creeping eruption, caused by cutaneous infection by larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum.
Synonym(s): Yangtze edema

gnathostomiasis

/gnatho·sto·mi·a·sis/ (nath″o-sto-mi´ah-sis) infection with the nematode Gnathostoma spinigerum, acquired from eating undercooked fish infected with the larvae.

gnathostomiasis

[nath′ōstōmī′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, gnathos + stoma, mouth + osis, condition
infection with the nematode Gnathostoma spinigerum, occurring when undercooked fish harboring the larvae is eaten. Because of its consumption of raw fish, the population of Southeast Asia, especially residents of Thailand and Japan, are particularly at risk. The larvae migrate, often in the subcutaneous tissue, causing a creeping eruption associated with intense eosinophilia. Occasionally they migrate to deeper tissues and cause abscesses or to the central nervous system, where they cause eosinophilic myeloencephalitis. The infection is treated by surgical removal or treatment with albendazole or ivermectin. See also cutaneous larva migrans.

gnath·o·sto·mi·a·sis

(nath'ō-stō-mī'ă-sis)
A migrating edema, or creeping eruption, caused by cutaneous infection by larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum.

gnathostomiasis

Infestation with the dog and cat parasitic worm Gnathostoma spinigerum that is common in the Far East. The intermediate hosts are fish and the tiny crustacean water flea Cyclops and the worm is acquired by eating undercooked fish or drinking water containing the flea. The adult worm settles in the tissues and can damage the lungs, kidneys, brain or eyes. The worm may settle visibly under the skin; otherwise the diagnosis is by antibody tests. Treatment is difficult.

gnathostomiasis

infection with the nematodes Gnathostoma spp. contracted by eating the intermediate host, e.g. undercooked fish infected with the larvae of G. spinigerum. Includes gastritis and cysts in the stomach wall caused by the adults and hepatitis caused by the larvae.
References in periodicals archive ?
The differential diagnosis includes other parasites (uncinariasis, gnathostomiasis, strongyloidiasis, myiasis), dermatophytosis, phytophotodermatitis, erythema chronicum migrans, granuloma annulare, and bullous impetigo.
Case reports, case series, epidemiological investigations, and laboratory studies were reviewed; high-risk behaviors for gnathostomiasis were identified, and human cases of gnathostomiasis were stratified as cutaneous gnathostomiasis, visceral gnathostomiasis, neurognathostomiasis, and ocular gnathostomiasis.
are widely consumed as food by humans (1-3) and are a common source of human gnathostomiasis, a foodborne zoonosis caused by advanced third-stage larvae (AL3) of Gnathostoma spp.
Hence, a full dietary history is crucial to identify possible exposure risks, as it would also be for anisakiasis ('sushi worms') and gnathostomiasis from raw fish, paragonimiasis from freshwater crabs and crayfish, and trichinosis following ingestion of raw or undercooked pork or more exotic meats such as wild boar, horse, bear or seal, depending on geographic location.
For example, Chagas disease is predominant in South America, whereas gnathostomiasis is predominant in Southeast Asia.
THOUSANDS OF LIVE SWAMP EELS SHIPPED TO NORTH America from Asia since the 1990's to ethnic food markets might be the origin of the food-borne illness gnathostomiasis.
Gnathostomiasis (Larva migrans profondus), leucocytoclastic vasculitis and erythema nodosum are implicated as the most common etiologic causes.
According to the study, people can also catch certain diseases (trichinosis, pentastomiasis, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis) by eating reptile meat.
A patient presenting with exactly the same constellation of symptoms, usually with some latency after a sojourn in Thailand (or circumscribed parts of South America) and after ingestion of raw fish dishes (or else unusual meats such as bullfrog meat) would most likely be diagnosed as having gnathostomiasis.
Abstract: Human gnathostomiasis is a food-born parasitic disease of relative importance in many countries in Southeast Asia.
To the Editor: Gnathostomiasis is an infestation by nematodes of the genus Gnathostoma; the main source of infection is raw freshwater fish.
Gnathostomiasis is a foodborne zoonotic helminthic infection caused by the third-stage larvae of Gnathostoma spp.