glycoside


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Related to glycoside: tannin, Cyanogenic glycoside

glycoside

 [gli´ko-sīd]
any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, such as fructoside (fructose), glucoside (glucose), or pentoside (pentose).
cardiac glycoside any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (Digitalis, etc.), having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd),
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar, leaving the anomeric carbon as the link; thus, condensation through the carbon with an alcohol, which loses its hydrogen on its hydroxyl group, yields an alcohol-glycoside (or a glycosido-alcohol); links with a purine or pyrimidine -NH- group yield glycosyl (or N-glycosyl) compounds.

glycoside

/gly·co·side/ (gli´ko-sīd) any compound containing a carbohydrate molecule (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically for the sugar contained, as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc.
cardiac glycoside  any of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (e.g., Digitalis, Strophanthus, Urginea ), acting on the contractile force of cardiac muscle; some are used as cardiotonics and antiarrhythmics.
digitalis glycoside  any of a number of cardiotonic and antiarrhythmic glycosides derived from Digitalis purpurea and D. lanata, or any drug chemically and pharmacologically related to these glycosides.

glycoside

(glī′kə-sīd′)
n.
Any of a group of organic compounds, occurring abundantly in plants, that yield a sugar and one or more nonsugar substances on hydrolysis.

gly′co·sid′ic (-sĭd′ĭk) adj.

glycoside

[glī′kəsīd]
Etymology: Gk, glykys, sweet
any of several carbohydrates that yield a sugar and a nonsugar on hydrolysis. The plant Digitalis purpurea yields a glycoside used in the treatment of heart disease.

glycoside

Biochemistry
A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal nitrogen glycoside or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin and ouabain.

Herbal medicine
Any of a number of medicinally active compounds produced by plants, which include hydrocyanic (prussic acid), which gives cough syrup its bitter almond flavour, digitoxin, a cardioactive agent, and salicin, the basis for salicylic acid.

glycoside

Pharmacology A molecule formed from the condensation of either a furanose or a pyranose with another molecule as an acetal, nitrogen glycoside, or phosphate ester glycoside; cardiac glycosides include digitoxin, digoxin, ouabain

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the H of the hemiacetal or hemiketal OH of the sugar, leaving the O of this OH as the link.

glycoside

an acetal derivative of a sugar that, on hydrolysis by enzymes or acids, gives rise to a sugar. Glycosides containing glucose are called glucosides, those with galactose are called galactosides. They render unwanted substances chemically inert or form food reserves such as GLYCOGEN.

Glycoside

An herbal carbohydrate that exerts powerful effect on hormone-producing tissues. The glycoside breaks down into a sugar and a non-sugar component.
Mentioned in: Echinacea

glycoside,

n plant-derived compound that breaks down into a sugar and an aglycon when processed with water.

gly·co·side

(glī'kō-sīd)
Condensation product of a sugar with any other radical involving the loss of the OH of the hemiacetal or hemiketal of the sugar.

glycoside (gli´kōsīd),

n a compound that contains a sugar as part of the molecule.

glycoside

any compound containing a carbohydrate moiety (sugar), particularly any such natural product in plants, convertible, by hydrolytic cleavage, into a sugar and a nonsugar component (aglycone), and named specifically after the sugar contained, as glucoside (glucose), pentoside (pentose), fructoside (fructose), etc.

cardiac glycoside
any one of a group of glycosides occurring in certain plants (e.g. Digitalis) having a characteristic action on the contractile force of the heart muscle. See also cardenolide, bufadienolide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reduced ribosomal methylation confers low-level amino glycoside resistance by reducing the affinity of the drugs for the 16S rRNA binding site.
2B), the contents of phenylethanoid glycosides such as forsythoside A, isoforsythoside and forsythoside B (Fig.
Fermentation-derived steviol glycosides will benefit food and beverage manufacturers in a number of ways:
It is also worthwhile drawing attention to glycyrrhizin, mogrosides (purified from Luo Han Guo fruit) and of course the recently EU regulatory approved steviol glycosides (from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves).
Plant-derived cardiac glycosides such as digoxin are used for the treatment of congestive heart failure and other cardiac disorders (1).
The glycosides responsible for this saccharine sensation are 300 times sweeter than ordinary sugar, yet they have the same caloric content as water.
Included in the formulation study were colas formulated with H FCS, Aspartame, and various steviol glycoside blends including Reb A and Reb D, with and without taste modulators.
Figure 1 shows the content of cardiac glycoside, calculated as % digitoxin, in the various Thevetia seed meal samples and the results showed a marked reduction in glycoside content irrespective of detoxification method employed.
All of these products meet the 95% steviol glycoside standards of the JECFA (Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives) and other national authorities, as well as the current EFSA opinion.
Arexis AB (Molndal, Sweden) has patented an immunogenic complex comprising at a least one glycoside and at least one lipid, integrated into an iscom complex or matrix, and at least one antigen which antigen is integrated into the iscom complex or coupled on to or mixed with the iscom complex or iscom matrix complex, characterized in that it also comprises at least one enzyme.
Eighteen flavonoids (14 flavonol glycosides, one flavone glycoside and three aglycones) have been found recently in Dryopteris villarii by Imperato (Amer.