glyconeogenesis


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to glyconeogenesis: glycogenesis

gluconeogenesis

 [gloo″ko-ne″o-jen´ĕ-sis]
the synthesis of glucose from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids and glycerol. It occurs primarily in the liver and kidneys whenever the supply of carbohydrates is insufficient to meet the body's energy needs. Gluconeogenesis is stimulated by cortisol and other glucocorticoids and by the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Formerly called glyconeogenesis.

gly·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. The formation of glycogen from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat, by conversion of the latter to d-glucose.
See also: glycogenesis.
2. Synonym(s): gluconeogenesis
[glyco- + G. neos, new, + genesis, production]

glyconeogenesis

/gly·co·neo·gen·e·sis/ (gli″ko-ne″o-jen´ĕ-sis) gluconeogenesis.

glyconeogenesis

gly·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
Formation of glycogen from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat, by conversion of the latter to d-glucose.
See also: glycogenesis
Compare: gluconeogenesis
[glyco- + G. neos, new, + genesis, production]

glyconeogenesis

formation of glycogen from non-carbohydrate sources; occurs in non-controlled diabetes mellitus (body protein and fat breakdown yield acetone and ketone bodies, used as an alternative cellular energy source)

gly·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glī'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The formation of glycogen from noncarbohydrates by conversion of the latter to glucose.
[glyco- + G. neos, new, + genesis, production]

glyconeogenesis (gli″kone″ojen´əsis),

n the synthetic creation of blood sugar from mediating metabolites. See also gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis.

glyconeogenesis

References in periodicals archive ?
Propylene glycol can also be converted to propionic acid in the rumen and transported to liver, where it is converted to glucose though the glyconeogenesis pathway (Emery et al.
The excess aminoacids are used for production of energy or as substrates for glyconeogenesis (Sherwin et al.
In addition, the higher serum concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase, glutamatepyruvate transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase induced by the transformed or natural Lactobacillus indicated that the metabolisms of lactic acid and amino acid, and glyconeogenesis reaction were increased, resulting in high concentration of triglyceride and low concentrations of uric acid in serum.
The low expression level of elongation factor Tu in the livers of ketotic cows indicates decreased levels of protein synthesis due to the limited availability of amino acids, because the most glucogenic amino acids sustain the glyconeogenesis pathway; thus increasing the level of alpha-enolase.