glycolysis

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glycolysis

 [gli-kol´ĭ-sis]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle. adj., adj glycolyt´ic.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis),
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available (as in an emergency situation); because molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis" Compare: Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway.
Synonym(s): glucolysis
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

/gly·col·y·sis/ (gli-kol´ĭ-sis) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to the simpler compounds lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle.glycolyt´ic

glycolysis

(glī-kŏl′ə-sĭs)
n.
A metabolic process that occurs in nearly all living cells in which glucose is converted in a series of steps to pyruvic acid and during which energy is released in the form of ATP.

gly′co·lyt′ic adj.

glycolysis

[glīkol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, glykys + lysis, loosening
a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid (anaerobic glycolysis) or pyruvic acid (aerobic glycolysis). The breakdown releases energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Also called Embden-Meyerhof pathway. See also citric acid cycle, lactic acid.
enlarge picture
Aerobic glycolysis

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available; given that molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis."
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

The breakdown of glucose or other sugars under the influence of enzymes, with the formation of lactic acid or pyruvic acid and the release of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The complex biochemical sequence by which glucose-6-phosphate is converted to pyruvate and ATP.
Glycolysisclick for a larger image
Fig. 177 Glycolysis . The individual steps of glycolysis.

glycolysis

‘sugar-splitting’, the first stage of CELLULAR RESPIRATION, occurring with or without the presence of oxygen, in which glucose is converted to two molecules of pyruvic acid. See Fig. 177 . See also AEROBIC RESPIRATION.

Glycolysis

The pathway in which a cell breaks down glucose into energy.

glycolysis

a catabolic pathway that breaks down glucose 6-phosphate, derived from glucose or glycogen, and in the process generates energy which leads to production of ATP. In aerobic conditions, pyruvate is the end-product. In conditions when oxygen cannot be utilized anaerobic glycolysis involves the additional step of reducing pyruvate to lactate. See also aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise.

glycolysis

anaerobic conversion of muscle glucose into lactic acid

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of glucose to lactic acid in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available.
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis (glīkol´isis),

n 1. the oxidation of glucose or glycogen by cytoplasmic enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway to pyruvate and lactate.
2. a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions occurring within cells, by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid or pyruvic acid, releasing energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate.

glycolysis

the enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in chemical bond energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in all tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means Salicinium affects every single reaction in the glycolytic pathway as soon as it is irreversibly attached to HK-II upon entry, and NADP is where "the buck stops.
In our study the lactic acid from glycolytic pathway was observed to be decreased in group DA, and previous studies have demonstrated that lactic acid produced from anaerobic glycolysis in astrocytes provides the primary metabolic fuel for neurons [sup][20] and is an essential element of neuron-glia metabolic interactions [sup][21],[22] as an alternative energy substrate for brain metabolism in the absence of oxygen.
51] an increase in proteins involved in most steps in the glycolytic pathway and a decrease in the gluconeogenic reactions in combination with a parallel reduction in several mitochondrial enzymes.
With the glycolytic pathway blocked, other pathways may also metabolize phosphorylated sugars.
Meyerhof was particularly interested in the glycolytic pathway and was the first scientist to detail several of the reactions that occurred.
Ghousia Begum and Vasantha Vijaya Raghavan (1999) observed that the enzyme glycogen phosphorylase is involved in glycolytic pathway in the initial catalysis of glycogen to glucose-1-phosphate, by which the glycogen is made available for energy releases under stress.
The data suggest that metabolic adaptations for limiting heat loss in winter include inhibition of aerobic oxidation, enhancement of anaerobic glycolytic pathways of energy supply, and reduction of water exchange.
The oxidative pentose pathway, for example, routes some of the glucose-6-P from the beginning of the glycolytic pathway through pentose sugars to fructose-6-P and glyceraldehyde-3-P (glycolytic intermediates).
Evidence indicates that lactate is one of the glycolytic pathway products originating via the action of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) on pyruvate, which is facilitated across the plasma membrane of cells by the proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) from the intracellular to the extracellular environment and vice versa by different isoforms.
The measurements of blood lactate concentration after fights indicated a moderate activation of the glycolytic pathway [11,30,31], which can be reinforced by the significant increase in glucose plasma during the fight.
The glycolytic pathway produces phosphoglycerate which is converted to phosphoserine and then serine which activates the NMDA receptor.
Since the TCA cycle has been turned off in cancer cells, the only ATP-generating pathway remaining in operation is the glycolytic pathway from sugar to pyruvate/lactate, producing a much smaller amount of ATP compared with that of the TCA cycle.