glycolysis


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Related to glycolysis: pyruvate, Electron transport chain

glycolysis

 [gli-kol´ĭ-sis]
the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle. adj., adj glycolyt´ic.

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis),
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available (as in an emergency situation); because molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis" Compare: Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway.
Synonym(s): glucolysis
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

/gly·col·y·sis/ (gli-kol´ĭ-sis) the anaerobic enzymatic conversion of glucose to the simpler compounds lactate or pyruvate, resulting in energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in muscle.glycolyt´ic

glycolysis

(glī-kŏl′ə-sĭs)
n.
A metabolic process that occurs in nearly all living cells in which glucose is converted in a series of steps to pyruvic acid and during which energy is released in the form of ATP.

gly′co·lyt′ic adj.

glycolysis

[glīkol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, glykys + lysis, loosening
a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid (anaerobic glycolysis) or pyruvic acid (aerobic glycolysis). The breakdown releases energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Also called Embden-Meyerhof pathway. See also citric acid cycle, lactic acid.
enlarge picture
Aerobic glycolysis

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of d-glucose to lactic acid (instead of pyruvate oxidation products) in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available; given that molecular oxygen is not consumed in the process, this is frequently referred to as "anaerobic glycolysis."
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis

The breakdown of glucose or other sugars under the influence of enzymes, with the formation of lactic acid or pyruvic acid and the release of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The complex biochemical sequence by which glucose-6-phosphate is converted to pyruvate and ATP.
Glycolysisclick for a larger image
Fig. 177 Glycolysis . The individual steps of glycolysis.

glycolysis

‘sugar-splitting’, the first stage of CELLULAR RESPIRATION, occurring with or without the presence of oxygen, in which glucose is converted to two molecules of pyruvic acid. See Fig. 177 . See also AEROBIC RESPIRATION.

Glycolysis

The pathway in which a cell breaks down glucose into energy.

glycolysis

a catabolic pathway that breaks down glucose 6-phosphate, derived from glucose or glycogen, and in the process generates energy which leads to production of ATP. In aerobic conditions, pyruvate is the end-product. In conditions when oxygen cannot be utilized anaerobic glycolysis involves the additional step of reducing pyruvate to lactate. See also aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise.

glycolysis

anaerobic conversion of muscle glucose into lactic acid

gly·col·y·sis

(glī-kol'i-sis)
The energy-yielding conversion of glucose to lactic acid in various tissues, notably muscle, when sufficient oxygen is not available.
[glyco- + G. lysis, a loosening]

glycolysis (glīkol´isis),

n 1. the oxidation of glucose or glycogen by cytoplasmic enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway to pyruvate and lactate.
2. a series of enzymatically catalyzed reactions occurring within cells, by which glucose and other sugars are broken down to yield lactic acid or pyruvic acid, releasing energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate.

glycolysis

the enzymatic conversion of glucose to lactate or pyruvate, resulting in chemical bond energy stored in the form of ATP, as occurs in all tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, the result showed an increased content of ATP concurrent with a decreased content of PCr in muscle, which indicated that there was an improved degradation of PCr catalyzed by CK, and therefore a delay of muscle glycolysis.
In addition to these physiological mechanisms, pika reduces dependence on oxygen by increasing anaerobic glycolysis in skeletal muscle (Zhu et al.
All methods of presentation of blood specimen for measuring glucose concentration mentioned have disadvantages of either incomplete inhibition of glycolysis, interference in determination of co-analytes, damage to cellular integrity or extracellular movement of potassium8.
Anaerobic glycolysis is used by tumor cells at hypoxic conditions, which is generally found in solid tumors due to deregulated vasculature.
The degradation of fatty acids by the glyoxylate cycle for the production of energy involves [beta]-oxidation, with its particular characteristics in glyoxysomes, glyoxylate cycle, Krebs cycle, gluconeogenesis and glycolysis.
In this work, we report on production of epoxy ester and amino-resin-modified epoxy ester resins using glycolysis products of postconsumer PET bottles.
It is assumed that main metabolic derangement is shifting of glycolysis to anaerobic pathway leading to increased production of lactate.
The role of glucose as the sole source of energy in cancer cells and the influence of glycolysis on tumor survival was not clearly established in the literature, however, we suspected a problem with glucose transport and degradation mechanisms including lactic acid as an end product due to the up-regulation of the lactic dehydeogenase enzyme in tumor cells.
Riggs' presentation PFK-158 a first-in-man / first-in-class inhibitor of PFKFB3, an enzyme that controls glycolysis and that is overexpressed in most hematological and solid tumors, will occur at 10:50 am on November 20 within Track 3 (Oncology).
5) NaF has been known to have an antiglycolytic effect that inhibits glycolysis by erythrocytes.
Carbon dioxide is a waste product of aerobic metabolism, as well as glycolysis.
It is likely that these observed increases are independent of glycolysis due to the fact that blood levels of lactate remained unchanged.