glycogenolysis


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glycogenolysis

 [gli″ko-jĕ-nol´ĭ-sis]
the splitting up of glycogen in the liver, yielding glucose.

gly·co·gen·ol·y·sis

(glī'kō-jĕ-nol'i-sis),
The hydrolysis of glycogen to glucose.

glycogenolysis

/gly·co·ge·nol·y·sis/ (-jĕ-nol´ĭ-sis) the splitting up of glycogen in the liver, yielding glucose.glycogenolyt´ic

glycogenolysis

(glī′kə-jə-nŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. glycogenoly·ses (-sēz′)
The biochemical breakdown of glycogen to glucose.

gly′co·gen′o·lyt′ic (-jĕn′ə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.

glycogenolysis

[glī′kōjenol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, glykys + genein + lysis, loosening
the breakdown of glycogen to glucose.

gly·co·gen·ol·y·sis

(glī'kō-jĕ-nol'i-sis)
The hydrolysis of glycogen to glucose.

glycogenolysis

The process of breakdown of GLYCOGEN to release molecules of GLUCOSE.

glycogenolysis

see GLYCOGEN.

Glycogenolysis

The process of tearing-down a glycogen molecule to free up glucose.

gly·co·gen·ol·y·sis

(glī'kō-jĕ-nol'i-sis)
The hydrolysis of glycogen to glucose.

glycogenolysis

the splitting up of glycogen in the liver or muscle, yielding glucose-1-phosphate.

muscle glycogenolysis
metabolic process under the regulatory control of adrenergic hormones or calcium ions for providing a rapid supply of ATP for muscle contraction and movement, particular for type II fibers. See also glycogen phosphorylase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maternal exposure to nicotine in the rat resulted in sustained or permanent suppression of glycolysis and glycogenolysis in the lung tissue of the pup (Maritz 1986, 1988), due to reduced synthesis of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase (the rate-limiting step in glycolysis) in nicotine-exposed animals (Kordom 2004; Kordom et al.
Elevated FFA has a stimulatory effect on glucose-6-phosphatase, the terminal enzyme of glycogenolysis by allosteric mechanism which inturn increases hepatic glucose production resulting in hyperglycaemia (28).
The investigation addressed the regulation of hormonal control and the enzymatic (allosteric) controls of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, glycogenolysis, lipogenesis, and lipolysis.
In the liver, beta-2 adrenergic agonists stimulate glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis (McPhee et al.
First, AMPK phosphorylates and activates phosphory-lase kinase, which then phosphorylates and activates glycogen phosphorylase, an enzyme controlling glycogenolysis and catalyzing the production of substrate for glycolysis [21].
6] appears to be due primarily to a decrease in gluconeogenesis, although there is some contribution from a decrease in glycogenolysis.
21] found in albino rats with experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin that during diabetes liver shows decrease in weight due to enhanced catabolic processes such as glycogenolysis, lipolysis, and proteolysis, which is the outcome of lack of insulin and/or cellular glucose in liver cells.
Adrenaline is a well-known insulin-antagonist that leads to an accumulation of blood glucose, as well as promoting the hepatic glycogenolysis.
1986) or decreased lactate production due to the inhibition of glycogenolysis and glycolysis (Graham et al.
IR causes decreased glucose uptake in muscle and adipose tissue, increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis in liver.