glycocalyx


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glycocalyx

 [gli″ko-kal´iks]
the glycoprotein-polysaccharide covering that surrounds many cells.

gly·co·ca·lyx

(glī'kō-kā'liks),
A PAS-positive filamentous coating on the apical surface of certain epithelial cells, composed of carbohydrate moieties of proteins that protrude from the free surface of the plasma membrane.
[glyco- + G. kalyx, husk, shell]

glycocalyx

/gly·co·cal·yx/ (gli″ko-kal´iks) the glycoprotein-polysaccharide covering that surrounds many cells.

gly·co·ca·lyx

(glī'kō-kā'liks)
A filamentous coating on the apical surface of certain epithelial cells, composed of carbohydrate moieties of proteins that protrude from the free surface of the plasma membrane; gives positive test result to periodic acid-Schiff procedure.
[glyco- + G. kalyx, husk, shell]

glycocalyx

a mass of filaments up to 3 μm thick produced by the membrane of intestinal brush-border microvilli, consisting of acid mucopolysaccharide and GLYCOPROTEIN, and thought to be associated with the digestion of small food molecules. Other animal cells also have a glycocalyx, on their cell coat, providing a mechanism that enables cells to recognise each other, an important process in embryonic development.

mucin

Glycoprotein, rich in carbohydrates, produced by the goblet cells and the subsurface vesicles of the conjunctiva which forms the basis of the mucous layer of the precorneal film. Mucin and the secreted glycocalyx (which consists of glycoproteins) are adsorbed by the epithelium of the cornea to convert it from a hydrophobic into a wettable hydrophilic surface. A deficiency in the production of mucin leads to an abnormally short precorneal film break-up time and to desiccation of the ocular surface. In addition, the mucous layer prevents microbial invasion of the cornea. In some contact lens wearers (especially of silicone hydrogel lenses) collapsed mucin, as well as lipids and tear proteins, accumulate behind the lens and form small, discrete spheres (called mucin balls or mucin plugs). These mucin balls cause neither discomfort nor loss of vision. See precorneal film; keratoconjunctivitis sicca; break-up time test; xerophthalmia.

glycocalyx

the glycoprotein-polysaccharide covering that surrounds many cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
A biofilm can be prevented by an ionic bombardment of the tube, presumably because this reverses the negative electrical charge in the glycocalyx.
With regard to receptor blockade, it has been shown that treating mouse peritoneum with glycocalyx polysaccharides will prevent Bacteroides fragilis from forming a biofilm.
The desiccated corneal cells lack the microvilli and glycocalyx necessary to render the surface wettable and this will manifest as a decrease in tear breakup time.
It's the glycocalyx, or slime layer, that allows certain cellulose-digesting bacteria to cling tightly to a surface.
The smoothness of the vascular endothelium along with the glycocalyx layer and the mucopolysaccharides adsorbed to the endothelial surfaces repel the clotting factors and platelets.
2] exposure is associated with remodeling of the luminal epithelial cell layer, including the formation of secretory epithelial cells and a glycocalyx layer consisting of glycoproteins (Paria et al.
In this sense, the hydrophobic silica surface simulates the cell membrane overlaid with the glycocalyx quite perfectly.
Infected bone and tendon remain -> reinfection Bacteria produce glycocalyx
The bacteria is able to adhere to the tubing through the secretion of a mucopolysaccharide, or slime, known as the glycocalyx (Fig 1).
One area of research on the cause of IC has focused on the lining of the bladder called the glycocalyx, made up primarily of substances called mucins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs).
When germs from the apical surface of prismatic cells cause lint, they find themselves immersed in the glycocalyx, which well expressed in this area.
Thus, endothelial glycocalyx, along with the mucopolysaccharides adsorbed onto the endothelial surface of the vascular endothelium, reject clotting factors and platelets--which have a significant role in thrombus formation (44), (45).