glycineamide ribonucleotide

(redirected from glycinamide ribonucleotide)

gly·cine·a·mide ri·bo·nu·cle·o·tide

, glycinamide ribonucleotide (glī'sin-ă-mīd rī'bō-nū'klē-ō-tīd, glī-sin'a-mīd rī'bō-nū'klē-ō-tīd),
An intermediate in purine biosynthesis, in which the amide nitrogen of glycineamide is linked to the C-1 of a ribosyl moiety.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cDNA inserts that were used as probes were those homologous to rRNA, and to mRNAs encoding acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoxygenase (LO), glucosyltransferase, inorganic phosphate translocator, nitrate reductase, and glycinamide ribonucleotide (GAR) synthetase/GAR transformylase.
Molecular biology of GDH-based biotechnology: Some of the GDH-synthesized RNAs that were used as probes were those homologous to mRNAs encoding glucosyltransferase, phosphate translocator [14]; acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoxygenase (LO) [12]; probes #1 for nitrate reductase (NR) and probe #2 for glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase/glycinamide ribonucleotide synthetases (GART/GARS) (Table 1).
De novo purine nucleotide synthesis: cloning of human and avian cDNAs encoding the trifunctional glycinamide ribonucleotide synthetase-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase-glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase by functional complementation in E.
One potential drawback of this approach is that it does not separate and quantify long-chain MTXPGs, which are known to have greater effects on the targets of MTX, such as glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide transformylase (30).
Marini, University of California Berkeley, will report on a resequencing study on prototypical vitamin-dependent enzyme genes, Ornithine Aminotransferase (OAT), Thymidylate Synthase (TYMS), Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR), and Glycinamide Ribonucleotide Transformylase (GART), in a 564 individual, ethnically diverse population.
The team found that this exciting molecule could simultaneously target and block at least three key folate-requiring enzymes (thymidylate synthetase; dihydrofolate reductase; and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase) that cancer cells need for cell division and tumor growth.
13, Agouron scientists report they have employed the techniques of X-ray crystallography to solve the three-dimensional atomic structure of a protein known as glycinamide ribonucleotide transformylase (GART).