glycerin


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glycerin

 [glis´er-in]
a clear, colorless, syrupy liquid, used as an osmotic diuretic to reduce intraocular pressure, a laxative, a soothing agent in cough preparations, and as a moistening agent and solvent for drugs; it is a trihydric sugar alcohol, being the alcoholic component of fats. See also glycerol.

glyc·er·ol

(glis'ĕr-ol),
A sweet viscous fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in the form of suppository for constipation, and as a vehicle and sweetening agent.
Synonym(s): 1, 2, 3-propanetriol, glycerin, glycerite (1) , glyceryl alcohol

glycerin

/glyc·er·in/ (-in) a clear, colorless, syrupy liquid used as a laxative, an osmotic diuretic to reduce intraocular pressure, a demulcent in cough preparations, and a humectant and solvent for drugs. Cf. glycerol.

glycerin

also

glycerine

(glĭs′ər-ĭn)
n.
Glycerol or a preparation of glycerol.

glycerin

[glis′ərin]
Etymology: Gk, glykys, sweet
a sweet, colorless oily fluid that is a pharmaceutic grade of glycerol. Glycerin is used as a moistening agent for chapped skin, an ingredient of suppositories for constipation, and a sweetening agent and vehicle for drug preparations. Also spelled glycerine.
Glycerolclick for a larger image
Fig. 174 Glycerol . Molecular structure.

glycerol

or

glycerin

a simple LIPID that is a basic component of fats. See Fig. 174 . Glycerol contains high amounts of energy which can be released in metabolism. see GLYCOLYSIS.

glycerol

; glycerin pig fat-derived fluid, used as a solvent or an emollient

hyperosmotic agent

A drug that makes blood plasma hypertonic thus drawing fluid out of the eye and leading to a reduction in intraocular pressure. It is used in solution in the treatment of angle-closure glaucoma and sometimes before surgery to decrease the intraocular pressure. Common agents include glycerin (glycerol), isosorbide, mannitol and urea. See hypertonic solution.

glyc·er·ol

, glycerin (glis'ĕr-ol, -in)
A sweet viscous fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils; used as a solvent, as a skin emollient, by injection or in the form of suppository for constipation, and as a sweetener.

glycerin (glis´ərin),

n a sweet, colorless, oily fluid that is a pharmaceutical grade of glycerol. Glycerin is used as a moistening agent for chapped skin, as an ingredient of suppositories for constipation, and as a sweetening agent and vehicle for drug preparation. It is also spelled glycerine.

glycerin

a clear, colorless, syrupy liquid, used as a humectant and as a solvent for drugs; it is a trihydric sugar alcohol, being the alcoholic component of triglycerides. Called also glycerol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant differences between the various glycerin supplements were analyzed by Duncan's multiple range test [19] at a 5% probability level (p<0.
Glycerin also presents adequate pH rates to anaerobic processes, coupled to high carbon content which ensures a better C/N (Carbon/Nitrogen) relationship in the mixture, avoiding digestion inhibition due to N excess and biogas production increase from 50 to 200% (Serrano et al.
Treatments consisted of glycerin inclusion (87% glycerol, obtained from soybean oil) in the diet in replacing corn, in four levels, being zero, five, 10 and 15% in the DM of the diet (Table 1).
The adhesive on the right of Figure 1 also contains glycerin.
The calcium hydroxide/CMCP/ Glycerin paste was very effective against the microorganisms tested.
However, companies have started using glycerin which is slowly replacing propylene.
The glycerin, which was used to treat irritated skin, dated back to November 12, 1925.
As worldwide annual output of biodiesel continues to grow, the need for commercial applications of crude glycerin has become more pressing.
We recognized the limitations of glycerin several years ago and set out on a mission to identify a better way to moisturize skin's many surface layers while not sacrificing the sensory benefits of a lotion," Unilever researcher Greg Nole explains.
While most body lotions use glycerin as their primary moisturizing ingredient, Vaseline Sheer Infusion combines glycerin with glycerol quat (GQ), a combination of glycerin and a positively charged group of molecules used in such products as hair conditioners, and hydroxy ethyl urea.
When this glycerin is refined to 99 percent purity, it can be used in many products, including pharmaceuticals, foods, drinks, cosmetics, and toiletries.