gluten


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Related to gluten: celiac disease, Gluten free diet

gluten

 [gloo´ten]
the protein derivative of wheat and other grains that gives dough its tough elastic character; avoidance of this substance will alleviate celiac disease (nontropical sprue) in certain persons, as well as immunologic disturbances in which there is an allergy to gliadin, a component of gluten.
gluten-free diet a diet in which wheat must be avoided, as well as other grains such as barley, oats, and rye that contain analogues to wheat gluten. Exceptions to this essentially grain-free diet are corn, rice, and millet. Wheat starch, which has been washed free of gliadin, is not restricted nor are there restrictions on carbohydrates or fats.
Patient Care. Following a gluten-free diet can relieve the problems associated with gluten allergy but preparing and enjoying gluten-free meals demands constant vigilance and motivation. Patients and family members who purchase and prepare patients' foods should read the labels on processed foods very carefully. Many contain hidden and unexpected wheat flour, for example, tomato catsup and ice cream. Processors also mix unacceptable and acceptable gluten-free soybeans and grains together in the same product. If there are any questions about the contents of a product, manufacturers will provide lists of their foods that are permissible on a gluten-free diet.

Foods to be avoided are listed in the accompanying table, as well as possible sources of hidden gluten. Additional information and recipes for baking with nongluten flours can be obtained from a dietitian or from publications found in most large bookstores.

glu·ten

(glū'tĕn),
The insoluble protein (prolamines) constituent of wheat and other grains; a mixture of gliadin, glutenin, prolamins, and other proteins; the presence of gluten allows flour to rise.
Synonym(s): wheat gum
[L. gluten, glue]

gluten

/glu·ten/ (gloo´ten) the protein of wheat and other grains that gives to the dough its tough elastic character.

gluten

(glo͞ot′n)
n.
1. The mixture of proteins, including gliadins and glutelins, found in wheat grains, which are not soluble in water and which give wheat dough its elastic texture.
2. Any of the prolamins found in cereal grains, especially the prolamins in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats, that cause digestive disorders such as celiac disease.

glu′ten·ous adj.

gluten

[glo̅o̅′tən]
Etymology: L, glue
the insoluble protein constituent of wheat and other grains (rye, oats, and barley). It is obtained from flour by washing out the starch and is used as an adhesive agent, giving to dough its tough, elastic character. For some people, ingestion of gluten results in potentially life-threatening malabsorption. See also celiac disease, food sensitivity/ hypersensitivity reaction.

gluten

See gliadin.

gluten

A wheat endosperm protein composed of gliadin and glutelin, which is inculpated in the pathogenesis of coeliac sprue.

glu·ten

(glū'tĕn)
The insoluble protein (prolamines) constituent of wheat and other grains; a mixture of gliadin, glutenin, and other proteins; believed to be an agent in celiac disease.
[L. gluten, glue]

gluten

The insoluble, glue-like protein constituent of wheat that causes stickiness in dough. Gluten consists of two proteins-gliadin and glutenin. Some people are sensitive to gluten and in these it causes the intestinal malabsorption disorder COELIAC DISEASE which is treated by a strict gluten-free diet. Gluten is found in wheat, oats, barley, rye and similar grain cereals.

Gluten

A protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and oats.
Mentioned in: Celiac Disease

gluten

insoluble protein in wheat, rye and barley (but not rice or oats)

gluten,

n a protein, found in wheat and rye. It is a common cause of food allergies.

glu·ten

(glū'tĕn)
Insoluble protein constituent of wheat and other grains; believed to be an agent in celiac disease.
[L. gluten, glue]

gluten

the protein of wheat and other grains that gives dough its tough, elastic character.

gluten sensitivity
called also gluten enteropathy. See wheat-sensitive enteropathy.

Patient discussion about gluten

Q. What is Gluten and what is gluten allergy? My nephew is coming to stay with me for a few days and his mother told me that since he is allergic to gluten that I shouldn't give him to eat any. What is gluten?

A. it is mainly wheat but you also have to watch out for other things like malt extract and lots more! you should really start researching it. I hvae it and even I don't know some stuff I shouldn't be eating

Q. Does anybody have good recipes for meals which don't contain gluten?? My 8 year old son has celiac disease. He is really suffering from not being able to eat so many things his brother and his friends can like pizza, pasta, birthday cakes, etc. I'd love him to have his own very tasty meals but I'm havin a hard time finding any recipes. If anyone knows some..

A. I have found some here- for chicken, pizza and brownies..
http://www.celiacdiseaseinfo.org/Wheat_free_gluten_free_recipes.html
and also- I am sure you can buy a cookbook that has gluten-free recipes.

Q. Is FTT a symptom of celiac? My 1.5 year old son has FTT (failure to thrive) and stomach aches. What could be causing it?

A. Failure to thrive lacks a precise definition, in part because it describes a condition rather than a specific disease. Children who fail to thrive don't receive or are unable to take in, retain, or utilize the calories needed to gain weight and grow as expected. FTT can be caused from many different things: social factors, conditions involving the gastrointestinal system like gastroesophageal reflux, chronic diarrhea, cystic fibrosis, chronic liver disease, and celiac disease. From a chronic illness or medical disorder, an intolerance of milk protein, infections or metabolic disorders.

More discussions about gluten
References in periodicals archive ?
Some books we recommend include 100 Best Gluten Free Recipes, BabyCakes Covers the Classics and Incredibly Easy Gluten-Free Recipes.
The major factors driving the gluten free food market are growing consumer awareness about health benefits of gluten free food and weight management and growing demand for innovative gluten free bakery products.
But the reality is, worldwide, gluten is a source of protein, both in foods prepared directly from sources containing it, and as an additive to foods otherwise low in protein.
Recent studies have strongly suggested that many, and possibly most, people who react badly to gluten may have a more challenging problem: sensitivity to a long list of foods containing certain carbohydrates.
One recent survey revealed that 30% of Americans are trying to cut back on or skip gluten in their diets - and that is 30 times the number of people who actually need to avoid gluten in order to stay healthy.
Here, we weigh up the pros and cons of choosing to go gluten free: Here, we weigh up the pros and cons of choosing to go gluten free: DOWNSIDES OF GOING GLUTEN-FREE WHEN YOU DON''T NEED TO.
Actress and healthy eating guru Gwyneth Paltrow, below, follows a gluten free diet | Actress and healthy eating guru Gwyneth Paltrow, below, follows a gluten free diet Many gluten-free products use refined or processed carbs, such as tapioca flour, which contain few nutrients.
The Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour is a special blend consisting of a handful of gluten-free ingredients, including whole grain brown rice flour, whole grain sorghum flour, sweet white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca flour and xantham gum.
In addition to celiac disease, which can be quite severe, a number of other gluten sensitivity disorders exist along a spectrum of intensity, creating an even larger pool of consumers pursuing a gluten-free diet.
64 manufacturers to label products as gluten it free.
Gluten free foods are potentially dangerous, believes Dr Geoffrey Forbes - a specialist in gastroenterology.