glycotoxicity

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glycotoxicity

(glī'kō-tok-sis'i-tē),
Pathologic changes in organs caused by elevated levels of glucose (for example, diabetes).
Synonym(s): glucotoxicity
References in periodicals archive ?
The data indicated that paeoniflorin could block glucotoxicity in biological cells or tissues.
In our study, decreasing total proinsulin + insulin level indicated insulin secretion defect and support the glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity phenomenon in type 2 DM (Dimitrova and Georgiev 2007).
Excessive glucose impairs insulin secretion and survival of pancreatic [beta] cells due to glucotoxicity, in which oxidative stress plays an important role.
It is important to note that exogenous insulin itself addresses both of the defects in Type 2 diabetes by improving endogenous insulin secretion (corrects insulin deficiency) and decreasing glucotoxicity and therefore decreasing insulin resistance.
This hypothalamic alteration potentiates increases in circulating glucose, free fatty acids, and triglycerides that, in turn, contribute to insulin resistance in the liver and muscle and beta-cell dysfunction via lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity.
Glucotoxicity and/or lipotoxicity may cause oxidative (free radical) damage to beta cells genes and to synthesis and secretion pathways (figure 3).
1c] level has been reported to be associated with unprovoked ketoacidosis, and the suggested mechanism is glucotoxicity to the beta cell.
Until transplanted islets have full function, we prefer to use insulin injection to protect islets from glucotoxicity.
In these patients it has been reported that insulin treatment at an early stage improves the glucotoxicity and secretory defect, and usually prevents the recurrence of ketoacidosis (2).
Both lipo- and glucotoxicity are proposed to induce [beta]-cell failure while the natural history of type 2 diabetes is that [beta]-cell function gradually deteriorates.
Experimental evidence from animal studies suggests that lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity reduce pancreatic [beta]-cell mass (22), a process mediated at least in part by uncompensated ER stress in [beta]-cells leading to apoptosis, further contributing to abnormal glucose-insulin homeostasis.