gluconeogenesis


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Related to gluconeogenesis: Cori cycle

gluconeogenesis

 [gloo″ko-ne″o-jen´ĕ-sis]
the synthesis of glucose from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids and glycerol. It occurs primarily in the liver and kidneys whenever the supply of carbohydrates is insufficient to meet the body's energy needs. Gluconeogenesis is stimulated by cortisol and other glucocorticoids and by the thyroid hormone thyroxine. Formerly called glyconeogenesis.

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.
Synonym(s): glyconeogenesis (2)

gluconeogenesis

/glu·co·neo·gen·e·sis/ (gloo″ko-ne″o-jen´ĕ-sis) the synthesis of glucose from molecules that are not carbohydrates, such as amino and fatty acids.

gluconeogenesis

(glo͞o′kə-nē′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The formation of glucose, especially by the liver, from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids and the glycerol portion of fats.

glu′co·ne′o·ge·net′ic (-ō-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.

gluconeogenesis

[glo̅o̅′kōnē′ōjen′əsis]
the formation of glucose from glycerol and proteins rather than from carbohydrates. Also called glyconeogenesis.
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Gluconeogenesis

gluconeogenesis

The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrate molecules–eg, amino acids, lactic acid

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.
Compare: glyconeogenesis

gluconeogenesis

The formation of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources, especially from AMINO ACIDS from protein. GLUCOCORTICOID hormones stimulate gluconeogenesis.

gluconeogenesis

the process by which PYRUVIC ACID (pyruvate) is converted to GLUCOSE. This is not the exact reversal of GLYCOLYSIS. Three of the reactions of glycolysis are irreversible and it is in these three that gluconeogenesis differs. In the CELL gluconeogenesis is normally more active when there is little need for ATP. The process meets the needs of the body for glucose when CARBOHYDRATE is not available in adequate amounts from the diet. Non-carbohydrates, such as FAT and PROTEIN, can be converted into glucose, notably in the LIVER and KIDNEY.

gluconeogenesis

synthesis of glucose from non-carbohydrate precursors mainly in the liver and to a smaller extent in the renal cortex. Precursors include pyruvate, lactate, glycerol and the glucogenic amino acids derived from skeletal muscle. The glucose-alanine cycle involves the conversion of alanine, formed in muscle, to glucose in the liver; activity of the cycle is increased during the postabsorptive state and in starvation or prolonged exercise, slowly mobilizing glycogen stores and using protein for the maintenance of normal blood glucose concentration. Gluconeogenesis and export of glucose from the liver are promoted by the hormone glucagon, and inhibited by insulin.

glyconeogenesis

formation of glycogen from non-carbohydrate sources; occurs in non-controlled diabetes mellitus (body protein and fat breakdown yield acetone and ketone bodies, used as an alternative cellular energy source)

glu·co·ne·o·gen·e·sis

(glū'kō-nē'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
The formation of glucose from noncarbohydrates, such as protein or fat.

gluconeogenesis

(gloo´kōnē´ōjen´əsis),
n the formation of glycogen or glucose from noncarbohydrate sources (e.g., the glycogenic amino acids, glycerol, lactate, and pyruvate) by pathways mainly involving the citric acid cycle and glycolysis.

gluconeogenesis

the synthesis of glucose from noncarbohydrate sources, such as amino acids, propionate and glycerol. It occurs primarily in the liver and kidneys whenever the supply of carbohydrates is insufficient to meet the body's metabolic demands or in the rumen by the action of bacteria in well-fed ruminants. Gluconeogenesis is stimulated by cortisol and other glucocorticoids and by glucagon. Formerly called glyconeogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Direct measurement of gluconeogenesis from [2,3]13C2]alanine in the human neonate.
Particularly at higher propionate concentrations in the rumen, gluconeogenesis continues to be stimulated in the liver (Lobley et al.
2000) and it also mimics as an insulin and decreases the expression of genes that control gluconeogenesis (Waltner-Law et al.
Metformin inhibits glycogen synthesis and gluconeogenesis in cultured rat hepatocytes.
Hence, the observed decline in the activity of PK in the liver of STZ-induced diabetic rats is responsible for the reduced glycolysis and amplified gluconeogenesis signifying that these two pathways are distorted in diabetes (Taylor and Agius 1988).
1993) studied effects of estrogen on gluconeogenesis and related parameters in male rainbow trout.
That gluconeogenesis may not play a role in acid-base metabolism and that diuretics can cause hypokalemia might be emphasized.
To ensure that blood glucose never drops too low, the liver manufactures glucose in a process called gluconeogenesis.
We also examined the gene expression of the gluconeogenesis enzymes glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver (data not shown).
The decrease of DMI and increase of demand in the transition period may result in negative energy balance (NEB) of dairy cows, which can stimulate gluconeogenesis and fat mobilization.
The results provide strong evidence that CS-917 inhibits the gluconeogenesis pathway in Zucker diabetic fatty rats and that this inhibition leads to profound glucose lowering in both fed and fasted states.
This last group includes disorders of gluconeogenesis, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the Krebs cycle, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain [1].