glucogenic

glucogenic

 [gloo″ko-jen´ik]
giving rise to or producing sugar.

glu·co·gen·ic

(glū'kō-jen'ik),
Giving rise to or producing glucose.
Synonym(s): glucoplastic

glu·co·gen·ic

(glū'kō-jen'ik)
Giving rise to or producing glucose.

glucogenic

giving rise to or producing sugar.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gluconeogenesis, which is a metabolic pathway that results in the generation of glucose from non-carbohydrate carbon substrates such as lactate, glycerol, and glucogenic amino acids, was determined by using L-glutamic acid administration in our experiment.
2008) reported a decrease in serum ketone concentrations of postpartum range cows fed a glucogenic precursor in the form of propionate salt, and other glucogenic agents such as propylene glycol or glycerol.
For example, glucogenic amino acids are converted to glucose during starvation (Lenhninger et al.
49] suggest that glucogenic diets in comparison with lipogenic diets, resulted in deposition of body reserves.
The topics include the basis and regulation of gut barrier function and epithelial cell protection and its application to the weaned pig, functional amino acids in swine nutrition and production, adjusting net energy in poultry diets, principles and applications of glucogenic nutrient feed evaluation for ruminants, and the nutritional manipulation of sub-acute ruminal acidosis in dairy cattle.
ALT actually is a glucogenic enzyme, and increased ALT has been demonstrated to be an indicator of impaired insulin signaling, which might not necessarily be associated with liver injury due to hepatic steatosis (3,15).
This arrangement seems to suggest the mediation of the ADG cells in the mobilization of the glucogenic reserves of the VC cells and in its transportation to the germinal line cells for their development and maturation, either directly or via other cellular types of the follicular wall, as hypothesized by Pipe (1987a, 1987b).
This result might be related to a greater availability of starch from CGW, which provided more glucogenic precursors (propionate) than starch from GC.
BCKAs are glucogenic (KIV and KMV) or ketogenic (KIC and KMV) precursors (1) and can regulate protein turnover (2-4).
The increasing effect has been attributed to an increased supply of glucogenic precursors resulting from changes in the pattern of rumen fermentation (Phipps et al.