glover's suture

(redirected from glovers suture)
Also found in: Dictionary.

glov·er's su·ture

a continuous suture in which each stitch is passed through the loop of the preceding one.

glover's suture

(glŭv′ərz)
n.
A continuous suture in which each stitch is passed through the loop of the preceding one.

glov·er's su·ture

(glŭv'ĕrz sū'chŭr)
A continuous suture in which each stitch is passed through the loop of the preceding one.

suture

(soo'chur) [L. sutura, a seam]
1. The line of union in an immovable articulation, as those between the skull bones or the articulation itself. Synonym: sutura See: raphe; synarthrosis
2. An operation in which soft tissues of the body are united by stitching them together.
3. The thread, wire, or other material used to stitch parts of the body together.
4. The seam or line of union formed by surgical stitches.
5. To unite by stitching.

absorbable surgical suture

A sterile strand prepared from collagen derived from healthy mammals or from a synthetic polymer. This type of suture is absorbed and thus does not need to be removed.

apposition suture

A suture to accurately approximate the edges off divided tissues.

approximation suture

A suture for apposing divided tissues.
See: apposition suture

basilar suture

The suture between the occipital bone and sphenoid bone that persists until the 16th to 18th year as the anteroposterior growth center of the base of the skull; also called spheno-occipital synchondrosis.

bifrontal suture

The suture between the frontal and parietal bones.

biparietal suture

The suture between the two parietal bones.

buried suture

A suture placed so that it is completely covered by skin or other surrounding tissue.

button suture

A suture in which the threads are passed through buttons or other prosthetic material on the surface and tied to prevent the suture material from cutting into the skin.

catgut suture

A suture material made from the sterilized submucosa of the small intestine of sheep. It is eventually absorbed by body fluids. Treatment with chromium trioxide (chromic catgut) or other chemicals delays the absorption time.

coaptation suture

A preliminary suture to approximate wound edges before definitive closure.

cobbler's suture

A suture in which the thread has a needle at each end.
Synonym: double-armed suture

continuous suture

The closure of a wound by means of one continuous thread, usually by transfixing one edge of the wound and then the other alternately from within outward in a variety of techniques. whip stitch Synonym: running suture; uninterrupted suture; whip stitch

coronal suture

A suture between the frontal and parietal bones.
Synonym: frontoparietal suture

cranial suture

One of the sutures between the bones of the skull.

dentate suture

An osseous suture consisting of long and toothlike processes between the involved bony segments.

double-armed suture

Cobbler's suture.

ethmoidofrontal suture

A suture between the ethmoid and frontal bones.

ethmoidolacrimal suture

A suture between the ethmoid and lacrimal bones.

ethmosphenoid suture

A suture between the ethmoid and sphenoid bones.

false suture

A suture of opposing bones in which fibrous union has not occurred.

figure-of-eight suture

A suture shaped like the number 8. It is used to repair round or elliptical defects.

frontal suture

An occasional suture in the frontal bone from the sagittal suture to the root of the nose. Synonym: mediofrontal suture; metopic suture

frontolacrimal suture

A suture between the frontal and lacrimal bones.

frontomalar suture

A suture between the frontal and malar bones.

frontomaxillary suture

A suture between the frontal bone and superior maxilla.

frontonasal suture

A suture between the frontal bones and the nasal bones.

frontoparietal suture

Coronal suture.

frontotemporal suture

A suture between the frontal and temporal bones.

glover's suture

Locking suture.

Halsted suture

See: Halsted, William Stewart

harelip suture

A twisted figure-of-eight suture used in the surgical correction of harelip.

harmonic suture

A suture in which there is simple apposition of bone.

intermaxillary suture

A suture between the superior maxillae.

internasal suture

A suture between the nasal bones.

interparietal suture

Sagittal suture.

interrupted suture

A suture formed by single stitches inserted separately, the needle usually being passed through one lip of the wound from without inward and through the other from within outward.

lambdoid suture

A suture between the parietal bones and the two superior borders of the occipital bone. Synonym: occipital suture; occipitoparietal suture

locking suture

A continuous suture in which the needle is passed through the loop of the preceding stitch.
Synonym: glover's suture

longitudinal suture

Sagittal suture.

maxillolacrimal suture

A suture between the maxilla and lacrimal bone.

mediofrontal suture

Frontal suture.

metopic suture

Frontal suture.

nasomaxillary suture

A suture between the nasal bone and superior maxilla.

nonabsorbable suture

A suture made from a material that is not absorbed by the body, such as silk, polymers, cotton, or wire. These sutures ultimately are removed or are placed in tissue deep to the skin where their presence will have minimal long-term consequences.

occipital suture

Lambdoid suture.

occipitomastoid suture

A suture between the occipital bone and the mastoid portion of the temporal bone. The occipitomastoid and lambdoid sutures meet at the asterion. Synonym: temporo-occipital suture

occipitoparietal suture

Lambdoid suture.

palatine suture

A suture between the palatine bones.

palatine transverse suture

A suture between the palatine processes and superior maxilla.

parietal suture

Sagittal suture.

parietomastoid suture

A suture between the parietal bone and the mastoid portion of the temporal bone.

petro-occipital suture

A suture between the petrous portion of the temporal bone and the occipital bone.

petrosphenoidal suture

A suture between the petrous portion of the temporal bone and the ala magna of the sphenoid bone.

purse-string suture

A suture entering and exiting around the periphery of a circular opening. Drawing the suture taut closes the opening.

quilled suture

An interrupted suture in which a double thread is passed deep into the tissues below the bottom of the wound, the needle being withdrawn so as to leave a loop hanging from one lip of the wound and the two free ends of the thread from the other. A quill, or more commonly a piece of bougie, is passed through the loops, which are tightened upon it, and the free ends of each separate thread are tied together over a second quill. The purpose of a quilled suture is prevention of tearing when tension becomes greater. Polymeric wound bridges have supplanted the use of quills and catheter segments. See: relief suture; button suture

relaxation suture

A suture that may be loosened to relieve excessive tension.

relief suture

A suture used primarily in abdominal wound closures to bring large margins of the wound close together to relieve tension and to provide protection to the primary wound closure; more commonly called a retention suture. These sutures are made of heavy-grade material and are tied over wound bridges or tubes of latex to avoid injury to the wound.

right-angled suture

A suture used in sewing intestine. The needle is passed in the same direction as the long axis of the incision, and the process is repeated on the opposite side of the incision, the suture being continuous.

running suture

Continuous suture.

sagittal suture

A suture between the two parietal bones. Synonym: interparietal suture; longitudinal suture; parietal suture

serrated suture

An articulation by suture in which there is an interlocking of bones by small projections and indentations resembling sawlike teeth.

shotted suture

A suture whose ends are passed through a perforated shot that is then compressed tightly over them, instead of tying a knot.

silk suture

A suture made of silk. It may be twisted, braided, or floss.

sphenofrontal suture

The articulation between the greater wing of the sphenoid bone and the frontal bone.

sphenoparietal suture

The articulation between the greater wing of the sphenoid bone and the parietal bone. The pterion of the skull is a region at the posterior end of this suture.

sphenosquamous suture

An articulation of the great wing of the sphenoid with the squamous portion of the temporal bone.

sphenotemporal suture

A suture between the sphenoid and temporal bones.

squamoparietal suture

A suture between the parietal bone and squamous portions of the temporal bone.

squamosphenoidal suture

A suture between the squamous portion of the temporal bone and great wing of the sphenoid bone.

squamous suture

The junction of the temporal and parietal bones.

subcuticular suture

A buried, (usually) continuous suture in which the needle is passed horizontally under the epidermis into the cutis vera, emerging at the edge of the wound but beneath the skin, then in a similar manner passed through the cutis vera of the opposite side of the wound, and so on until the other angle of the wound is reached.

temporo-occipital suture

Occipitomastoid suture.

temporoparietal suture

The suture between the temporal and parietal bones.

tension suture

A suture used to reduce the pull on the edges of a wound.

twisted suture

A suture in which pins are passed through the opposite lips of a wound and material is wound about the pins, crossing them first at one end and then at the other in a figure-of-eight fashion, thus holding the lips of the wound firmly together.

uninterrupted suture

Continuous suture.

vertical mattress suture

An interrupted suture in which a deep stitch is taken and the needle inserted upon the same side as that from which it emerged, and passed back through both immediate margins of the wound. The suture is then tied to the free end on the side the needle originally entered. This suture is primarily used in closing the skin.

wire suture

A suture of varying gauges of metal (usually stainless steel) that may be used in a wide variety of applications, including wound closure, intestinal repair, and the repair of sternotomies.