powder

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powder

 [pow´der]
an aggregation of particles, as that obtained by grinding or rubbing a solid.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr),
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances; the degree of fineness of a pow'der is related to passage of the material through standard sieves.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

(pou′dər)
n.
1. A substance consisting of ground, pulverized, or otherwise finely dispersed solid particles.
2. Any of various preparations in the form of powder, as certain cosmetics and medicines.

pow′der·er n.

powder

the dried product of an extraction process in which a substance is first mixed with a solvent such as alcohol or water. Then, the solvent is removed completely. The dry solid that remains either is already in powder form or may be ground into it.

powder

Chinese medicine
A general term for ground herbs and formulas used in Chinese herbal medicine to prepare in capsules, infusions, liquors, porridges, ointments, pastes and pills; powders are less concentrated than decoctions, gentler, are best suited for chronic conditions.

powder

Drug slang A pulverized abuse substance–eg, heroin, amphetamine, cocaine Vox populi A pulverized material. See Antler velvet powder, Dover's powder, Fluticasone propionate inhalation powder, Inheritance powder, James Fever powder, Talcum powder.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. pharmaceutics A homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
3. A single dose of a powdered drug, enclosed in an envelope of folded paper.
4. To reduce a solid substance to a state of very fine division.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder,

n in homeopathy, a dosage form, often lactose, that has had a small amount of homeopathic remedy poured on it. This powder can then be consumed by the patient.

pow·der

(pow'dĕr)
1. A dry mass of minute separate particles of any substance.
2. In pharmaceutics, a homogeneous dispersion of finely divided, relatively dry, particulate matter consisting of one or more substances.
[Fr. poudre; L. pulvis]

powder

an aggregation of particles obtained by grinding or triturating a solid.

dusting powder
a fine powder used as a talc substitute.
glove powder
sterile and special grind for powdering surgical gloves.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an open wound or body cavity, cornstarch glove powder behaves like a true foreign body, causing an exaggerated inflammatory response, frustrating the body's defense systems.
Aerosolized glove powder can transport bacteria and microbes from the contaminated gloves themselves or from other sources, potentially inducing a nosocomial infection or occupational illness.
Aerosolized glove powder carries aeroallergen concentrations of latex proteins, which easily cling to the glove powder particles.
Glove powder can act as a fomite, carrying infectious organisms such as VRE (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) or MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).
Cornstarch glove powder has been mistaken for some microorganisms because it stains Gram positive.
Other documented adverse reactions to cornstarch glove powder include: postoperative synovial inflammation, retroperitoneal fibrosis, meningismus post-craniotomy, post-thoracotomy syndrome, endophthalmitis, pseudotumors, pericardial fibrosis, intra-abdominal granulomas in postoperative heart surgery patients, corneal inflammation postophthalmic surgery, adhesions to the Fallopian tubes, pelvic pain, infertility and myocardial contamination following catheterization.
1, 5] The most effective way to remove glove powder is to wash the outside of the glove with a 10 ml of povidone-iodine solution for 60 seconds, followed by a 30-second rinse with sterile water.
The report considered exposure to latex gloves and aerosolized glove powder significant risks to the respiratory health of employees (30).
If the employee has a contact dermatitis reaction, a dermatologist (or allergist) can perform patch-testing for the glove type, the glove powder, and the most common rubber chemical additives, such as thiuram, carba mix, and mercaptomix.
Perno (1988), "Contact Urticaria and Anaphylactoid Reaction from Cornstarch Glove Powder," Contact Dermatitis, 19:61-78.
False-negative results by polymerase chain reaction due to contamination by glove powder.