glossopharyngeal nerve


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to glossopharyngeal nerve: glossopharyngeal neuralgia

glossopharyngeal

 [glos″o-fah-rin´je-al]
pertaining to the tongue and pharynx.
glossopharyngeal nerve the ninth cranial nerve; it supplies the carotid sinus, mucous membrane, and muscles of the pharynx, soft palate, and posterior third of the tongue, and the taste buds in the posterior third of the tongue. By serving the carotid sinus, the glossopharyngeal nerve provides for reflex control of the heart. It is also responsible for the swallowing reflex, for stimulating secretions of the parotid glands, and for the sense of taste in the posterior third of the tongue. See also anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.

glossopharyngeal nerve

(glô′sō-fə-rĭn′jē-əl, -jəl, -făr′ən-jē′əl, glŏs′ō-)
n.
Either of the ninth pair of cranial nerves that contain both sensory and motor fibers and supply the tongue, soft palate, pharynx, and parotid gland.

glossopharyngeal nerve

either of a pair of cranial nerves essential to the sense of taste, sensation in some viscera, and secretion from certain glands. The nerve has both sensory and motor fibers that pass from the tongue, parotid gland, and pharynx; communicate with the vagus nerve; and connect with two areas in the brain. Also called Hering's nerve, nervus glossopharyngeus, ninth cranial nerve.
enlarge picture
Glossopharyngeal nerve
Enlarge picture
GLOSSOPHARYNGEAL NERVE

glossopharyngeal nerve

A mixed nerve that is sensory for taste and for the carotid sinus and body, and motor for secretion of saliva and contraction of the pharynx.

Sensory

Taste fibers from the posterior third of the tongue join visceral sensory fibers from the pharynx, auditory tube, middle ear, carotid sinus, and carotid body and run back to their neuronal cell bodies in the superior and inferior ganglia of the glossopharyngeal nerve, located in the jugular foramen. The axons of these ganglionic neurons follow the glossopharyngeal roots into the hindbrain where they synapse in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the spinal nucleus of the trigeminal nerve.

Motor

The glossopharyngeal nerve emerges from the medulla as a line of small rootlets just anterior to the rootlets of the vagus nerve (CN X). The glossopharyngeal rootlets collect into a single nerve that emerges from the skull through the jugular foramen, along with the vagus and spinal accessory (CN XI) nerves. The glossopharyngeal nerve then divides into branches as it runs along the stylopharyngeus muscle.

Course

CN IX.

Synonym: ninth cranial nerve See: illustration
See also: nerve

glossopharyngeal nerve

the 9th CRANIAL NERVE of vertebrates; a dorsal root nerve. It is concerned with the swallowing reflex and back of the tongue taste buds in mammals.

glossopharyngeal

pertaining to the tongue and pharynx.

glossopharyngeal nerve
the ninth cranial nerve; it supplies the carotid sinus, mucous membrane, muscles of the pharynx, soft palate and caudal part of the tongue, and the taste buds in the caudal part of the tongue. By serving the carotid sinus, the glossopharyngeal nerve provides for reflex control of the heart. It is also responsible for the swallowing reflex, for stimulating secretions of the parotid glands, and for the sense of taste in the caudal part of the tongue. Lesions of the nerve cause dysphagia or inability to swallow, regurgitation through the nostrils and sometimes abnormality of the voice and interference with respiration. See also Table 14.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors favored using the glossopharyngeal meatus as the target for GPN radiosurgery for three reasons: first, the opening of the jugular foramen is a good landmark well visualized on CT images; second, at this location the glossopharyngeal nerve is separated from the vagus and accessory nerves; and third, the distance from the brainstem allows higher radiosurgery doses (18).
Glossopharyngeal neuralgia associated with anomalus glossopharyngeal nerve.
They ascend lateral to the common carotid artery and they pass posterior to the internal carotid artery, superior to the XIIth cranial nerve and inferior to the glossopharyngeal nerve.
The cutaneous orifice of the third branchial fistula also opens anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, but it courses only superiorly, passing posterior to the common or internal carotid artery, superior to the hypoglossal nerve, and inferior to the glossopharyngeal nerve.
We believe that tonsillar schwannomas arise from a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve.
1) They arise from chemoreceptors along Jacobson's nerve and the tympanic branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve.