glossolalia

(redirected from glossolalic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to glossolalic: glossolalist, Theopneustic glossolalia

glossolalia

 [glos″o-la´le-ah]
gibberish that simulates coherent speech.

glos·so·la·li·a

(glos'ō-lā'lē-ă),
Rarely used term for unintelligible jargon or babbling.
[glosso- + G. lalia, talk, chat]

glossolalia

/glos·so·la·lia/ (glos″o-la´le-ah) gibberish that simulates coherent speech.

glossolalia

(glô′sə-lā′lē-ə, glŏs′ə-)
n.
1. Fabricated and nonmeaningful speech, especially such speech associated with a trance state or certain schizophrenic syndromes.
2. See gift of tongues.

glossolalia

[glos′ōlā′lyə]
Etymology: Gk, glossa + lalein, to babble
speech in an unknown "language," as in "speaking in tongues" during a state of religious ecstasy when the message being transmitted through the speaker is believed to be a message from a celestial spirit or from God.

glossolalia

Psychiatry Gibberish, 'speaking in tongues'

glos·so·la·li·a

(glos'ō-lā'lē-ă)
Rarely used term for unintelligible jargon or babbling.
[glosso- + G. lalia, talk, chat]

glossolalia

‘speaking in tongues’. The production of a stream of usually meaningless sounds resembling words. Glossolalia is a skill acquired by some people who enjoy a high state of religious excitement and is often accorded respect by like-minded observers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Literary, and especially poetic, language has always known this; and by staging the suspension of langue and discourse, the semiotic and semantic--and, by analogy, glossolalic "contagion" and muteness (or madness)--Coetzee's palimpsestuous "Postscript" leads its readers to experience, in Agamben's words just cited, the "paradoxical act that simultaneously implies both subjectification and desubjectification".
Comprehensive bibliographical data can be found in Charles Edwin Jones, A Guide to the Study of the Holiness Movement (Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press, 1974); idem, Black Holiness: A Guide to the Study of Black Participation in Wesleyan Perfectionist and Glossolalic Pentecostal Movements (Metuchen, NJ: American Theological Library Association and Scarecrow Press, 1987); and William Kostlevy, Holiness Manuscripts: A Guide to Sources Documenting the Wesleyan Holiness Movement in the United States and Canada (Metuchen, NJ: American Theological Library Association and Scarecrow Press, 1994).
He's heard the message immanent in the rhythms and patterns of this white noise, but he's had to hear it in a pure, babbling, glossolalic form before it can have an effect on him.