glomerular disease

glomerular disease

any of a group of diseases in which the glomerulus of the kidney is affected. Depending on the particular disease, there may be hyperplasia, atrophy, necrosis, scarring, or deposits in the glomeruli. The symptoms may be abrupt in onset or slowly progressive. Compare acute tubular necrosis. See also glomerulonephritis.

glomerular disease

Any of a large group of diseases that affect the glomerulus of the kidneys. They may be classified by clinical severity, by histological changes in the kidney, or by etiology. Etiological factors include primary glomerular disease; disease secondary to systemic disease, such as lupus erythematosus or polyarteritis; infectious disease such as streptococcal infection, malaria, syphilis, or schistosomiasis; metabolic disease such as diabetes or amyloidosis; toxins such as mercury, gold, or snake venom; serum sickness; and drug hypersensitivity.

Glomerular disease may also be associated with hereditary disorders (e.g., Alport's syndrome, Fabry's disease). See: glomerulonephritis; kidney; nephritis; nephrotic syndrome

The clinical consequences of glomerular diseases are associated both with the causes and with the extent of glomerular damage and typically include edema, proteinuria and hypertension.

glomerular disease (glōmer´yələr),

n a group of diseases in which the glomerulus of the kidney is affected.
References in periodicals archive ?
In analyses stratified by CKD diagnosis, the association between blood lead level and GFR was stronger among children with glomerular disease underlying CKD; in this group, each 1-[micro]g/dL increase in blood lead was associated with a -12.
Recurrent and de novo glomerular disease after renal transplantation: a report from Renal Allograft Disease Registry (RADR).
Childhood nephrotic syndrome (NS) (6) is the most frequent glomerular disease that presents during childhood, primarily owing to a disturbed immune function.
A second study showed worse renal follow-up with increased interstitial fibrosis, with more than 20% GS and diffuse diabetic glomerular disease in 39 patients followed for 6 months, (4) also confirmed.
Thus, the overall aim of this project is to define the role of GATA3 in normal adult kidney and in kidney models of glomerular disease.
Diabetes 44% High blood pressure 28% Other causes 19% Glomerular disease 7% Cystic kidney disease 2% SOURCE: NATIONAL KIDNEY AND UROLOGIC DISEASES INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE Note: Table made from pie chart.
Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a glomerular disease with a characteristic pathologic presentation that includes segmental scarring involving some but not all glomeruli.
1) The pathology and pathogenesis of glomerular disease have become far better understood since the introduction of ultrasound (US)-guided renal biopsies; this technique has transformed the diagnosis, treatment and long-term outcome of glomerular disease.
1-3) The pathogenesis of glomerular disease in patients with hydatid disease is not well understood, with most supporting an immune complex-mediated mechanism.
A family history of chronic glomerular disease or impaired vision may stem from this syndrome, and men are more likely to progress to chronic renal failure and/or vision loss.
However a possible link between abnormal T cell response and glomerular disease was described 30 years ago.
These suggest significant glomerular disease that was confirmed by a renal biopsy as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.